About

Juliet Grable is a freelance writer with one foot in southern Oregon and another on a sailboat in Sausalito.

Contributions

Keeping Clapper Rails High and Dry

February 16, 2012 by Juliet Grable

New artificial islands at Oakland’s Arrowhead Marsh provide some welcome refuge for endangered clapper rails. But can they be expanded into enough other habitats to keep the birds safe from rising sea levels?

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Reporter’s Notebook: Two birders, a Few Wastewater Ponds, 104 Species of Birds

December 19, 2011 by Juliet Grable

How do you see 104 species of birds in one day at a wastewater pond? Ride along on a Christmas Bird Count with PRBO Conservation ornithologist Rich Stallcup and partner Heather Cameron.

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Holiday seasons come and go, but not the Canada geese

November 25, 2011 by Juliet Grable

Nothing heralds autumn and the holiday season like the evocative sound of geese, honking their way South on a blast of Arctic air. But many Canada geese now skip the annual migration and set up permanent shop in the Bay Area by taking advantage of the abundant food and absence of predators. That's requiring some wildlife managers to come up with creative ways to remove these feathered friends.

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Construction Begins on Largest Restoration in San Pablo Bay Refuge

October 25, 2011 by Juliet Grable

At first glance, Cullinan Ranch isn't much to look at. Bound by Dutchman Slough to the north and Highway 37 to the south, the Solano County property consists of 1,500 acres of low-lying fields. But this former farmland is about to become the largest restored marsh in the San Pablo Bay National Wildlife Refuge.

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Fur Seals Making a Comeback on the Farallones

October 05, 2011 by Juliet Grable

Recent surveys on the Farallones show that the islands' cute, feisty fur seals continue to make a comeback, more than a century after the West Coast population was hunted nearly to extinction.

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Turning a Weedy Island into Prime Habitat in Richardson Bay

August 17, 2011 by Juliet Grable

Can a pile of dredge spoils covered in a jumble of invasive weeds be transformed into an island paradise for shorebirds, songbirds, and seals? The folks at the Richardson Bay Audubon Center and Sanctuary think so. And after years of planning, ground-breaking on their ambitious restoration project has finally begun on a small island near Tiburon.

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Artist Finds Graphic History at the Farallones

August 15, 2011 by Juliet Grable

Artist Eva Chrysanthe has always been intrigued by the Farallon Islands, those distant humps on the western horizon. But when she discovered a trove of old letters about the islands, she discovered a dramatic story that's taking shape as a new graphic novel about the Farallon Egg Wars. She'll talk about the project this Thursday in San Francisco.

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Protecting the Little Fish, Food for Many

July 12, 2011 by Juliet Grable

They're the little guys. Small, silver, nondescript fish that are so hard to tell apart that many people simply call them "baitfish." But though they don't command the attention of a breaching humpback whale or trophy tuna, these humble creatures--from anchovies to squid--play a starring role in local marine ecosystems. New legislation aims to force fisheries managers to consider that role when writing plans for the state's commercial fishing fleet.

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Sowing the Seeds of Restoration

July 01, 2011 by Juliet Grable

Save the Bay turns 50 years old this year, and their native plant nurseries prove the organization is as vital as ever, with volunteers putting in thousands of hours growing native plant seedlings for the group’s restoration projects.

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Of Mice and Birds at the Farallones

May 26, 2011 by Juliet Grable

U.S. Fish and Wildlife officials extended to June 10 the deadline for accepting public comments on a controversial proposal to eradicate nonnative house mice on the Southeast Farallon Islands. Opponents cite concerns that the poisons will endanger a range of wildlife on or near the islands, while proponents say the project will help threatened seabirds and the island ecosystem.

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Kids Clean Up and Make Art at Ocean Beach

May 20, 2011 by Juliet Grable

How do you get 500-plus kids to sit still on the beach? Tell them a helicopter is about to fly overhead and take their collective photograph, and that by the way, they'll also be on television. It happened at Ocean Beach, and all in the name of ocean conservation.

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Feds Seek Comment on Farallones Mouse-eradication Plan

May 11, 2011 by Juliet Grable

Now extended through June 10, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is seeking comment on a plan to use rodenticides to eradicate non-native house mice from the South Farallon Islands. Officials say the mice threaten nesting seabirds, but critics charge that the effort could actually endanger birds on the island.

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Kids’ Ocean Day: Cleaning Beaches and Making Art

May 10, 2011 by Juliet Grable

On May 19 thousands of kids from San Diego to Vancouver will gather on seven West Coast beaches to pick up trash and create impressive aerial art. These kids are participating in Ocean Day, part of the California Coastal Commission's Adopt-A-Beach Program.

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Citizen Scientists Keep Tabs on Egrets

May 04, 2011 by Juliet Grable

We mostly see egrets and herons standing silently in shallow wetlands, on the hunt. But a group of dedicated citizen scientists makes a point to watch them in their nesting colonies, sometimes in seemingly unlikely spots. Join us on a trip to a heronry near Cordelia.

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Glean Team Clears the Field

April 06, 2011 by Juliet Grable

It all started with some crooked zucchinis in Bolinas. They didn't conform to the strict aesthetic standards of the market, so they were snipped from the vine and left to rot. The folks at Marin Organic recognized an opportunity and, and the group's School Lunch and Gleaning Program was born.

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Tracking an Extreme Mammal: Elephant Seals

March 14, 2011 by Juliet Grable

They can plunge to depths of more than a mile and stay submerged for 90 minutes without coming up for air. They can swim up to 14,000 miles a year. The males can weigh over two and a half tons. You could say elephant seals are "Extreme Mammals," record-holders in several categories, including deepest divers. And with new tracking methods, we're learning more than ever about these amazing creatures.

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A Good Season for Bay Herring

March 01, 2011 by Juliet Grable

Each winter, a strange spectacle takes over San Francisco Bay. You'll see evidence of it: moving rafts of agitated birds; strings of cormorants; pods of sea lions; plunge-diving pelicans. And fishing boats out on the Bay. But you won't see the cause for this excitement: thousands of herring en route to their spawning grounds. This year's season has been pretty good, but some folks think we should still go lightly on the lowly herring.

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Winter Wildlife Watching

February 02, 2011 by Juliet Grable

Valentine's Day is right around the corner, and nothing melts the heart like the sight of a newborn marine mammal pup. How about a thousand of them? That's how many elephant seals have been born at Ano Nuevo State Park, and another 500 are on the way. Throw in 700 more at Point Reyes. Oh, and it's the beginning of gray whale migration too. What are you waiting for?

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From Gully to Gallery: Restoration Art in Berkeley

January 25, 2011 by Juliet Grable

Marin-based artist Daniel McCormick creates "perma-sculptures," structures he places on hillsides and creek banks to slow the rush of run-off from degraded agricultural lands and paved-over urban areas. But this time, he's designed and create works especially for a gallery show, which opens with an artist talk on January 27.The show is a first for both the artist and the curators. He designed each piece specifically for the exhibit, taking into consideration the challenges of hanging them on a wall rather than staking them into a stream bank.

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Kids Counting Birds in the Canal

January 19, 2011 by Juliet Grable

The annual Christmas Bird Count is the longest-running bird study in the world. But it's not exactly kid-friendly. So Wendy Dalia of Richardson Bay Audubon Center spearheaded Marin County's first-ever youth Christmas Bird Count on January 8. She's already looking forward to next year.

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