About David Loeb

David Loeb

Since 2001, David Loeb has served as editor and then publisher of Bay Nature magazine and executive director of the nonprofit Bay Nature Institute. A Bay Area resident since 1973, David moved here after graduating from college in Boston. The decision was largely based on a week spent visiting friends in San Francisco the previous January, which had included a memorable day at Point Reyes National Seashore. In the late 1990s, after many years working for the Guatemala News and Information Bureau in Oakland, David had the opportunity to spend more time hiking and exploring the parks and open spaces of the Bay Area. Increasingly curious about what he was seeing, he began reading natural history books, attending naturalist-led hikes and natural history courses and lectures, and volunteering for several local conservation organizations. This was rewarding, but he began to feel that the rich natural diversity of the Bay Area deserved a special venue and a dedicated voice for the whole region, to supplement the many publications devoted to one particular place or issue. That’s when the germ of Bay Nature magazine began to take shape. In February 1997, David contacted Malcolm Margolin, publisher of Heyday Books and News from Native California, with the idea of a magazine focused on nature in the Bay Area, and was delighted with Malcolm’s enthusiastic response. Over the course of many discussions with Malcolm, publishing professionals, potential funders, and local conservation and advocacy groups, the magazine gradually took shape and was launched in January 2001. It is still going strong, with a wider base of support than ever.

Contributions

Bayview: The Growing Understanding of Rangelands

March 31, 2015 by David Loeb

Just as demand for locally sourced beef is rising, the ability of local ranchers to produce it is going down. The soaring rents and real estate prices that make it difficult for young writers and families to live in the Mission (or Gilman) District also make it difficult for local ranchers—young and old—to keep ranching in west Marin or southern Santa Clara.

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Bayview: Eye-Opening “Functional Beauty”

January 01, 2015 by David Loeb

  I f you’re going to succeed as a species in this world, you need to get three things right: ...

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Bayview: California’s Water Year

September 24, 2014 by David Loeb

We can't control the rain. But that doesn't mean there's nothing we can do. Bay Nature Publisher David Loeb on California's drought.

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Coyote Hills Regional Park-Marsh & Hills

August 13, 2014 by David Loeb

Coyote Hills Regional Park in Fremont is not a huge park (978 acres), but it encompasses three distinct ecosystems, with ...

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Sonoma Valley Regional Park, Corridor Ridge Trail

August 13, 2014 by David Loeb

 This small 162-acre park in Glen Ellen, Sonoma might not appear to be a destination for those who don’t live ...

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Hazelnut Trail – San Pedro Valley County Park

August 13, 2014 by David Loeb

  The Hazelnut Trail takes its name from the profusion of California hazelnut bushes that grow along the length of ...

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Sobrante Ridge from the southeast

August 13, 2014 by David Loeb

Highlights: Great views; rare manzanita; mature live oak woodland and open grasslands; wildflowers in spring. A rare and endangered manzanita ...

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Bay View: America’s Wild Anniversary

July 10, 2014 by David Loeb

As far as I know, the passage of the Wilderness Act 50 years ago was the first time in human history that a society has declared by statute that certain areas shall never be developed, nor exploited for commercial gain, nor intruded on by motorized transport.

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Letter from the Publisher: April Showers, May Flowers?

March 26, 2014 by David Loeb

By the time you read this in April, the die will have been cast and the show — of unknown quality and duration — should be on. So head on out for a springtime pilgrimage, and while you’re at it, why not share your best wildflower sightings with us and our readers?

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Letter from the Publisher: Watching Mount Diablo Heal Itself

January 13, 2014 by David Loeb

I have a mixed reaction when I hear that a place I know and love has been hit by wildfire. On the one hand, there’s a visceral recoil: Will this cherished place survive? But on the other hand, there’s a thrill that comes from anticipating dramatic changes to a familiar landscape.

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