Climate Change

Rising seas, droughts, invasive species, and fires are some of the impacts Northern California can expect as the world warms. Climate change is dramatically altering the San Francisco Bay Area’s ecosystems and raising profound questions among conservationists about how to help species best adapt to new conditions.

Latest from Climate Change

In An Unusual Year for Upwelling, Research Cruise Keeps an Eye on Marine Sanctuaries’ Rich Life

September 29, 2014 by Eric Simons

For the past decade, the Applied California Current Ecosystem Studies expedition has monitored the ocean waters just west of the Bay Area. Recently, researchers took the boat in search of krill, the base of California's marine life.

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Bayview: California’s Water Year

September 24, 2014 by David Loeb

We can't control the rain. But that doesn't mean there's nothing we can do. Bay Nature Publisher David Loeb on California's drought.

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High Temperatures Threaten Sacramento River’s Fall-Run King Salmon

September 23, 2014 by Ted Andersen

The early fall king salmon spawning run on the Sacramento River is taking place between Red Bluff and Redding, but prolonged drought has led to reduced flows from Lake Shasta and high water temperatures downriver, which could deal many egg nests a death blow.

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TBC3: Wrestling Climate Change to the Ground

August 04, 2014 by Mary Ellen Hannibal

It’s not “news” to Bay Nature readers that climate change is in the process of giving a serious thwack to living systems. But what’s less well understood is how plants and animals and the habitats they inhabit are moving—and being altered—in response to changing temperature and precipitation patterns.

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It’s Fun! It’s Science! It’s a Bioblitz!

July 10, 2014 by Joe Eaton

On the last weekend of March, 9,000 people armed with binoculars, butterfly nets, cameras, and smartphones, spread out over an ...

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The Jumbo Squid Have Left California. Or Have They?

May 22, 2014 by Sean Greene

Humboldt Squid have moved into and out of California, sometimes for years at a time, for centuries. Now an El Niño approaches the Pacific Coast, and squid researchers are waiting.

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Fire Followers Arrive, with Scientists Right Behind

May 09, 2014 by Joan Hamilton

An expert in rare plants, Heath Bartosh is especially interested in “fire followers,” plants whose seeds stay buried in the ground until heat or smoke stimulates germination. These annuals flourish for one to three years. And then they’re gone—until the next fire.

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Living Shorelines

April 07, 2014 by Sean Greene

A few years ago the State Coastal Conservancy went looking for something new: habitat restoration that would also address sea level rise. Two years into a pilot experiment, the results suggest that in the appropriate places this green climate adaptation might work.

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The Elusive Black Rail May Adapt Better Than You’d Think

March 21, 2014 by Alison Hawkes

Black rails are one of the most secretive of birds. But new research is showing that the scurrying marshland species can pick up and move if it must.

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