Habitats: Freshwater, Bay, Marine

As the region’s name implies, water is a defining feature of the Bay Area. The largest Pacific estuary in the Americas — the San Francisco Bay — is the foundation for one of California’s most important ecological habitats and a link to the Pacific flyway. Meanwhile, the Pacific coastline connects the region to the global marine environment, bringing about a set of vulnerabilities and advantages apparent in a complex world.

Latest from Habitats: Freshwater, Bay, Marine

Ship Retraces Legacy of Once Mighty Bay Shrimp

October 02, 2014 by Jimmy Tobias

If the Chinese shrimping villages were still around today, could the California bay shrimp support a thriving industry as it once did?

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In An Unusual Year for Upwelling, Research Cruise Keeps an Eye on Marine Sanctuaries’ Rich Life

September 29, 2014 by Eric Simons

For the past decade, the Applied California Current Ecosystem Studies expedition has monitored the ocean waters just west of the Bay Area. Recently, researchers took the boat in search of krill, the base of California's marine life.

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High Temperatures Threaten Sacramento River’s Fall-Run King Salmon

September 23, 2014 by Ted Andersen

The early fall king salmon spawning run on the Sacramento River is taking place between Red Bluff and Redding, but prolonged drought has led to reduced flows from Lake Shasta and high water temperatures downriver, which could deal many egg nests a death blow.

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Ocean Beach’s Sand Supply Dries Up, Leaving Plovers Squeezed

September 16, 2014 by Eric Simons

San Francisco's Ocean Beach, already struggling with foot traffic and free-roaming domestic pets, faces a serious erosion problem.

4 Comments

Connecting with Whales in Monterey Bay

September 11, 2014 by Beth Slatkin

Spotting whales in Monterey Bay is at historic highs. Marine biologist Dorris Welch explains why.

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Replanting the Bay’s Underwater Meadows

August 26, 2014 by Katie Harrington

A new effort has been launched to restore 70 acres of native eelgrass in the San Francisco Bay, paid for with Cosco Busan oil spill money.

3 Comments

Marsh Once More: The Bay Trail Takes Off at Hamilton Airfield

July 10, 2014 by Ariel Rubissow Okamoto

Looking out across the 650-acre project toward the distant Godzilla arm of the backhoe against the blue sky, I finally see on the ground what the planners and engineers have been describing to me ever since I first began writing stories about Hamilton ten years ago: a tapestry of habitats.

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On Its 40th Anniversary, the Farallon Wilderness Remains Uniquely Wild

July 08, 2014 by Eric Simons

Each wilderness area has its own unique essence, and the Farallon Islands' might just be how utterly, unbelievably wild it is.

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The Jumbo Squid Have Left California. Or Have They?

May 22, 2014 by Sean Greene

Humboldt Squid have moved into and out of California, sometimes for years at a time, for centuries. Now an El Niño approaches the Pacific Coast, and squid researchers are waiting.

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The Last Oyster

May 20, 2014 by Sean Greene

The West Coast’s native Olympia oyster serves an important role as an ecosystem builder with its ability to filter the water. But owing to reasons that are still somewhat unclear, over the last few millennia native oysters have largely disappeared from the San Francisco Bay.

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