Habitats: Freshwater, Bay, Marine

As the region’s name implies, water is a defining feature of the Bay Area. The largest Pacific estuary in the Americas — the San Francisco Bay — is the foundation for one of California’s most important ecological habitats and a link to the Pacific flyway. Meanwhile, the Pacific coastline connects the region to the global marine environment, bringing about a set of vulnerabilities and advantages apparent in a complex world.

Latest from Habitats: Freshwater, Bay, Marine

The Last Oyster

May 20, 2014 by Sean Greene

The West Coast’s native Olympia oyster serves an important role as an ecosystem builder with its ability to filter the water. But owing to reasons that are still somewhat unclear, over the last few millennia native oysters have largely disappeared from the San Francisco Bay.

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“Bay Nature on the Air” Nominated for Northern California Emmy Award

May 14, 2014 by Beth Slatkin

Bay Nature on the Air -- nature shorts based on features from Bay Nature magazine -- has been nominated for a regional Emmy Award.

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A Long Time Coming, but the Bay’s Back at Former Hamilton Airfield

April 30, 2014 by Ariel Rubissow Okamoto

Last week a backhoe knocked a hole in the outer levee at the former Hamilton Army Airfield, letting the Bay seep back onto a landscape that had undergone 18 years of preparation for this moment.

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The Drought Could Harm Research At Farallon Islands

April 24, 2014 by Alison Hawkes

Without rainwater, Farallon Islands research station is unable to function.

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A New Haven for the Leopard Shark

April 17, 2014 by Alessandra Bergamin

Leopard sharks are a shallow-water coastal species, with a range extending from southern Oregon to southern Baja California. They are the most abundant shark species in the San Francisco Bay.

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Could this be the end of California’s drift gillnet fishing?

April 16, 2014 by Alison Hawkes

The tide may be finally turning against the use of drift gillnets off California waters. WARNING: Disturbing images.

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Nudibranchs, Kings of the Tidepool, Command An Audience

April 14, 2014 by Alessandra Bergamin

There are lots of pretty pictures of the 3,000 nudibranchs species already discovered, but few specifics. Key elements of their fundamental biology are still poorly understood, or not understood at all. Or not even examined.

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Turning the Corner on Invasive Spartina

April 04, 2014 by Lexi Pandell

Today, after 13 years of work by the Invasive Spartina Project and its partners to eliminate the invasive hybrid, the team is now into the rebuilding phase of its long-term plan, replanting the area with native cordgrass in hopes that it will reclaim its former territory.

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Ask The Naturalist: How Will the Drought Impact Amphibians?

March 21, 2014 by Alison Hawkes

Question: Will newts, frogs and salamanders be out in full force in the Bay Area this spring?

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The Elusive Black Rail May Adapt Better Than You’d Think

March 21, 2014 by Alison Hawkes

Black rails are one of the most secretive of birds. But new research is showing that the scurrying marshland species can pick up and move if it must.

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