Habitats: Freshwater, Bay, Marine

As the region’s name implies, water is a defining feature of the Bay Area. The largest Pacific estuary in the Americas — the San Francisco Bay — is the foundation for one of California’s most important ecological habitats and a link to the Pacific flyway. Meanwhile, the Pacific coastline connects the region to the global marine environment, bringing about a set of vulnerabilities and advantages apparent in a complex world.

Latest from Habitats: Freshwater, Bay, Marine

Avian Cholera Outbreak in Redwood Shores Pond

January 15, 2014 by Alessandra Bergamin

An avian cholera outbreak at a Redwood Shores wastewater treatment pond and popular birding site -had killed more than 200 birds as of Tuesday, according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

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Orcas of the California Coast: Deciphering the Culture of Killer Whales

January 13, 2014 by Sarah Allen

Our growing understanding of orca ecotypes — bolstered by recent advances in research technology and protocols — has been a major key to unlocking the mystery of the killer whales of the eastern North Pacific.

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The Wild Life of a Coastodian: An Interview with Richard James

January 13, 2014 by Eric Simons

From the western edge of the continent, Richard James blogs about life and litter at Coastodian.org, takes photos, and dreams up art projects that challenge our view of the world.

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Photographer Tory Kallman Gets His Orca Breach

January 09, 2014 by Alessandra Bergamin

On a whale watching trip in the Monterey Bay, photographer Tory Kallman witnessed one of nature's great events—an orca in pursuit of lunch. One of the resulting photographs became Bay Nature's January 2014 cover image.

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Richardson Bay Herring Return, With an Entourage

January 07, 2014 by Eric Simons

The North Bay played host to one of nature's great spectacles this week, the annual Richardson Bay spawning of Pacific herring, an event eagerly anticipated by hungry animals and curious people -- and an event all the more precious for how close it once came to disappearing.

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The Man Who Sees the Trash

January 06, 2014 by Eric Simons

Richard James, who keeps the beaches of Point Reyes as litter-free as he can, has an obsessive eye for the discordant note of trash. His life as a park volunteer comes with a lesson: You learn strange things when you pick up after the world.

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A Child’s Book of Habitat

January 02, 2014 by Beth Slatkin

Wildlife biologist and environmental science writer (and former Bay Nature contributing editor) Matthew Bettelheim temporarily switched out of his academic ...

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The Rise of Cyanobacteria at Pinto Lake

January 02, 2014 by Patricia Waldron

This past fall a cyanobacteria known as, Microcystis aeruginosa, spiked toxin levels above the state's safe recreational exposure limit at Watsonville’s Pinto Lake. Scientists and the community have begun tackling the problem and hope that conclusions drawn at Pinto Lake will help remedy cyanbacterial blooms elsewhere.

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Cordell Bank and Gulf of the Farallones Looking to Expand

December 17, 2013 by Rachel Diaz-Bastin

A proposal now under NOAA consideration would more than double the size of the sanctuaries, and protect the entire Sonoma County coastline and part of the Mendocino coastline to Point Arena, as well west to the edge of the continental shelf.

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Capturing King Tides Through Citizen Science

December 13, 2013 by Alessandra Bergamin

Since 2010 the California King Tides Initiative has been documenting king tide events through photography—presenting a very real picture of rising sea levels. This year, the project has expanded to include a citizen science program, that will help researchers ground climate models.

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