Human History

Human settlement in the San Francisco Bay Area dates back 7,000 years to early Native American settlements. Today, the region is a teeming metropolis of 6 million people that collectively challenge the health of the region’s ecosystems. How it got this way — from Spanish acquisition to the Gold Rush boom and on to contemporary battles over land development — is a story that prompts a deeper understanding of our place in the landscape.

Latest from Human History

Q&A With Rue Mapp: Turning to Nature for Healing

December 12, 2014 by Laki Sarah

"Right now," says founder Rue Mapp, "we need nature more than ever." A Q&A with the founder of Outdoor Afro as she prepares for nationwide "healing hikes."

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Not Doomed (Yet): A Q&A With Extinction Experts Anthony Barnosky and Elizabeth Hadly

November 24, 2014 by Eric Simons

Two biologists discuss Earth's alarming extinction rate.

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Ascending the Mountain

November 06, 2014 by Beth Slatkin

For the Mountain Institute's Ed Bernbaum. connecting people to mountains' spiritual and cultural meaning is the key to protecting them.

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Meet the Future: A New Generation Rising at the East Bay Parks

October 22, 2014 by Lexi Pandell

The EBRPD has become known for fostering long-term employees, but the baby boomers who were hired during the district’s major expansion years of the 1970s are retiring.

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The View From the Blind: Hunters Take Aim for Conservation

October 14, 2014 by Aleta George

Nature and culture writer Aleta George takes hunting field trips with a noted conservationists -- and finds an extended series of lessons about the intimate and indelible connection between hunting and conservation.

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Q&A With Jose Gonzalez, Founder of Latino Outdoors

October 08, 2014 by Lexi Pandell

A Q&A with Jose Gonzalez, whose group Latino Outdoors works to make nature accessible to everyone.

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American Wilderness: Back to the Future in Vallejo

September 10, 2014 by Jonah Raskin

Environmental groups gathered in downtown Vallejo over the weekend to mark the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act, to ponder the meaning of the word and to filter the concept through the lenses of California's diverse communities.

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Marsh Once More: The Bay Trail Takes Off at Hamilton Airfield

July 10, 2014 by Ariel Rubissow Okamoto

Looking out across the 650-acre project toward the distant Godzilla arm of the backhoe against the blue sky, I finally see on the ground what the planners and engineers have been describing to me ever since I first began writing stories about Hamilton ten years ago: a tapestry of habitats.

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The Last Oyster

May 20, 2014 by Sean Greene

The West Coast’s native Olympia oyster serves an important role as an ecosystem builder with its ability to filter the water. But owing to reasons that are still somewhat unclear, over the last few millennia native oysters have largely disappeared from the San Francisco Bay.

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Why Bay Nature?

April 22, 2014 by Bay Nature Staff

Publisher David Loeb had his Bay Nature epiphany while hiking in China Camp State Park. That’s when he conceived of ...

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