Apr-Jun 2009

In this issue, our updated Transit to Trails map offers many options for getting out into nature via public transit. You can also learn about the numerous Bay Area species of native bees, the history and habitat of Brooks Island, and the community effort that has protected and restored Mori Point. Or peruse the beautiful woodcut prints and text in an excerpt from Gary Snyder’s and Tom Killion’s new collaborative book, Tamalpais Walking. Cover photo by Rollin Coville.

 

Issue Content

Transit to Trails (2009)

April 01, 2009 by Bay Nature

Make getting there part of the adventure with our updated map of the region’s transit-accessible trails. From backpacking on Mount Diablo to strolling the Bay shore in Mountain View, there are many ways to get outdoors without adding to your carbon footprint.

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A Refuge in the Harbor

April 01, 2009 by Joe Eaton

Within view of Richmond, Brooks Island today is a haven for nesting terns. That’s just its latest incarnation. A short paddle across the harbor to this island refuge takes you back centuries and “away from it all.”

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Dinosaur Plants

April 01, 2009 by Sue Rosenthal

While living dinosaurs are nowhere to be found in California these days, you can see recognizable descendants of plants that lived with them–right here in the modern Bay Area.

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Development and Open Space at Concord Naval Station

April 01, 2009 by Aleta George

After several years of planning, many hours of meetings, and spirited community involvement, the Concord City Council voted on January 12 in favor of a reuse plan for the 5,100-acre Concord Naval Weapons Station, the former base bordering Pittsburg and Concord. The council opted for the “clustered villages” model, which calls for a blend of […]

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New Marine Life Management and Protections

April 01, 2009 by Aleta George

The Pacific Coast is home to more than 50 species of rockfish, including Pacific snapper. Rockfish and other groundfish were once plentiful, but years of commercial fishing have depleted stocks. In some cases there has been an 80 to 90 percent loss. Rod Fujita, ocean scientist with the Environmental Defense Fund, says fishermen aren’t to […]

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Protecting Plovers

April 01, 2009 by Aleta George

On a gray September day, I walked north on Ocean Beach from Sloat Boulevard to the Cliff House. It was far from an idyllic walk on that black-sand beach. I saw several dead seagulls, one being eaten by a crow. Hundreds of jellyfish had washed ashore, and trash outweighed seashells. Posted signs said I was […]

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Sudden Oak Death Blitz

April 01, 2009 by Aleta George

The deadly plant disease known as sudden oak death (SOD) has spread to 14 coastal counties, and according to UC Berkeley’s Forest Pathology and Mycology Lab, the continuing epidemic threatens the survival of tanoaks, an ecologically important native tree, as well as several species of true oaks. Tanoaks and oaks are dying, but the pathogen […]

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Yerba Buena Island Habitat Restoration

April 01, 2009 by Aleta George

In a scorching Indian summer day in 1886, three to four thousand people climbed the steep goat trails to the summit of Yerba Buena Island, the 100-acre natural island between San Francisco and the East Bay. A San Francisco newspaperman remarked on the contrast of the women’s colorful skirts against the “barren wasteland” of grass […]

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Hayward Haven

April 01, 2009 by Joe Eaton

At Hayward Regional Shoreline, East Bay Regional Park District staff and volunteers have created new nesting habitat for the endangered California least tern. Here’s the recipe…

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A Helping Hand for the Hairstreak

April 01, 2009 by Josiah Clark

It has been said that the movement of a butterfly’s wings can change the course of world events. Some San Francisco neighbors hope that will be true for the green hairstreak…

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Impressions of Tamalpais

April 01, 2009 by Dan Rademacher

We talk with Tom Killion, who grew up in Mill Valley. He has been making woodblock prints of the California landscape since he was a teenager, including about 60 of Mount Tamalpais.

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The Eye of the Beholder

April 01, 2009 by John Muir Laws

Who knew that the kestrel hovering over that vacant field has superpowers?

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In the Key of Bee

April 01, 2009 by Erik Vance

Gordon Frankie has an obsession, and he hopes it’s contagious: In gardens around the Bay Area, dozens of species of native bees, many nothing like the more familiar but nonnative honeybee, await your discovery, and your help.

5 Comments

Letter from the Publisher

April 01, 2009 by David Loeb

Good news: It finally started raining again! Many of us held our collective breath through bone-dry January, all the while enjoying the guilty pleasure of midwinter outings in sunshine and shirtsleeves. I had a sneaking suspicion that the weeks without rain and without a state budget were somehow linked, with the drying up of funding […]

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Mori’s Story

April 01, 2009 by Dan Rademacher

A town comes together to protect beautiful Mori Point, home to threatened frogs, endangered snakes, and superb wildflowers.

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Mulch Madness

April 01, 2009 by Sue Rosenthal

Google “mulch” and you’ll find university websites from Alaska to Florida touting mulch as one of the most environmentally friendly and effective tools for improving a backyard garden. But that mulch keeps native bees from digging their nests…

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Nature’s Safety Goggles

April 01, 2009 by Joe Eaton

Do birds have extra eyelids?

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Splendor in the Grass

April 01, 2009 by Joseph Kinyon

In spring, it’s breeding time for bay pipefish, remarkable seahorse relatives that hide among the eelgrass in protected bays and estuaries along the West Coast.

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Tamalpais Walking

April 01, 2009 by Tom Killion

Poet Gary Snyder and artist Tom Killion have been walking on and around Marin’s iconic mountain for decades. These prints and text from a new book capture the mountain’s magic and the allure it’s had for generations of artists, poets, and hikers.

2 Comments

A Bayshore Getaway in Silicon Valley

April 01, 2009 by John Dorrance

Stevens Creek is a 20-mile stream that originates on Black Mountain at the crest of the Santa Cruz Mountains before cutting through the heart of Silicon Valley and out into San Francisco Bay. Eventually, the Stevens Creek Trail will run the entire length of the stream. But you can check it out now…

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Footloose and Car-Free in the Bay Area

April 01, 2009 by David Loeb

Make getting there part of the adventure with our update of the region’s transit-accessible trails. From backpacking on Mount Diablo to strolling the Bay shore in Mountain View, there are many ways to get outdoors without adding to your carbon footprint.

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Overnight on Mount Diablo

April 01, 2009 by Ryan Branciforte

It has been over a year now since I took the plunge into car-free existence. The one-way, overnight backpack trip up and over Mount Diablo that I took last fall is one example of the kind of adventure I have been enjoying since I said good-bye to my car.

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Transit to Trails Map

April 01, 2009 by Bay Nature Staff

Download our updated map showing transit connections to protected parks and open spaces all over the San Francisco Bay Area.

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Up and Down at Point Reyes

April 01, 2009 by Joe Soule

If the Sweet Lumber Company had had its way, the landscape of Inverness Ridge in West Marin would be more tree farm than forest. In the 1950s the company built a mill pond and started logging the giant Douglas fir trees. The creation of the Point Reyes National Seashore stopped the logging in its tracks. […]

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