Jan-Mar 2002

 

Issue Content

Bay Area Fish Study

January 01, 2002 by Marilyn Smulyan

The first ever comprehensive assessment of fish in Bay Area streams is now available to the public. From 1992 to 1998, EPA biologist Robert A. Leidy investigated 79 streams that empty directly into the Bay, and found 37 different species of fish. One remarkable finding of this study was that native fish were the dominant […]

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Edgewood Preserve

January 01, 2002 by Marilyn Smulyan

One of the best places to experience a slice of Bay Area landscape as it might have looked before European settlement is San Mateo’s Edgewood County Park and Preserve. Offering a wide diversity of ecological zones, Edgewood is home to nearly 500 plant species and is best known for the native plants that thrive on […]

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Elephant Seals at Point Reyes

January 01, 2002 by Marilyn Smulyan

Last January, “Ear to the Ground” wrote about the elephant seals at Año Nuevo State Park in San Mateo County, the area’s best known population of these large pinnipeds. But did you know that there is a growing population at another site in the Bay Area? According to park biologists, breeding elephant seals began returning […]

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Environmental Docent Trainings

January 01, 2002 by Marilyn Smulyan

If you’re interested in sharing your infectious love of nature with others, consider signing up for one of the many local training programs that teach you to be a docent or environmental educator. Just a small sampling: If marine environments are your passion, you can sign up for BayIt, a City of Berkeley program to […]

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International Migratory Bird Day 2002

January 01, 2002 by Marilyn Smulyan

On a national level, the FWS sponsors an annual celebration of International Migratory Bird Day (IMBD) on May 11. Here in the Bay Area, the SFBNWR and the San Francisco Bay Wildlife Society have issued a call to all artists who enjoy drawing or painting birds to enter the IMBD Poster Contest. Anyone, from kindergartners […]

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Launch of Important Bird Areas Program

January 01, 2002 by Marilyn Smulyan

On November 28, 2001, the president of the National Audubon Society, John Flicker, came to the Bay Area to launch the U.S. component of the international “Important Bird Areas (IBA) Program.” The announcement was made here to underscore the global signifcance of San Francisco Bay as a sanctuary for migratory birds. With over a million […]

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New Cachuma Redwoods Book

January 01, 2002 by Marilyn Smulyan

One of the distinguishing features of life in the Bay Area is the presence of the world’s tallest trees, Sequoia sempervirens, coast redwoods. Now, everything you might want to know about redwoods can be found in two new books. Coast Redwood: A Natural and Cultural History, edited by John Evarts and Marjorie Popper (Cachuma Press), […]

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Ranching Photo Exhibit

January 01, 2002 by Marilyn Smulyan

Intrigued by a way of life that is “so remarkably different from that lived by the other six and a half million people in the Bay Area, one that has been passed down from one generation to the next, AND where people have intimate relationships with the land and with animals,” local schoolteacher and photographer […]

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How have exotic garden plants impacted our native fauna?

January 01, 2002 by Glenn Keator

Animal habits, or behavior, can indeed change due to the presence of nonnative plants. Two examples come to mind. Fennel is a plant native to the Mediterranean region of Europe which became an invasive weed in the Bay Area subsequent to its introduction as a food plant. One of our native swallowtail butterflies, Papilio zelicaon, […]

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From the Bottom Up

January 01, 2002 by Micky Ellinger

It’s small, it’s restless, and it changes sex halfway through its life. Plus, the humble bay shrimp occupies a crucial niche in the complex food web of San Francisco Bay. It once played a significant role in the economy and culture of the local Chinese community. Today, both the shrimp and those who fish for it are still hanging on, but it hasn’t been easy.

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Legacy of the Red Ore

January 01, 2002 by John Dorrance

Numerous animals make their homes in burrows in the hills of this Santa Clara County park, but none dig as deep as the miners who hauled mercury-laden ore out of the ground for 125 years.

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Letter from the Publisher

January 01, 2002 by David Loeb

The past three months have not been easy ones for our planet. The events of 9/11 continue to reverberate globally, from bombs over Afghanistan to imperiled civil liberties and recession at home. It is not immediately clear what the role of a regional nature magazine should be in the face of such momentous world events. […]

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Lichens

January 01, 2002 by Elizabeth Rush

Is it a mushroom? A moss? Bacterial scum? Trod on underfoot or passed by in blissful ignorance, lichens are perhaps the least understood element of the Bay Area landscape. But they are everywhere. And when we look closely at them, a colorful and diverse world opens up before our eyes.

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