Jul-Sep 2004

 

Issue Content

Darn ‘Skeeters, the Unwelcome Summer Guests

July 01, 2004 by Linda Watanabe McFerrin

A little standing water is all it takes for mosquitoes to get going, so it’s no wonder they’ve been making evolutionary hay for over 30 million years—and acting as efficient disease transporters along the way, even here in the temperate Bay Area.

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Presidio Art Exhibit: Birds of the Pacific Slope

July 01, 2004 by Christine Sculati

This summer, a new exhibit in San Francisco’s Presidio celebrates one of the world’s most diverse urban bird habitats. From

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Bullet Train Through Henry W. Coe State Park and Orestimba Wilderness

July 01, 2004 by Christine Sculati

Where can you find more than 80,000 acres of wildlands with hundreds of miles of trails only 36 miles from

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Cooper’s Hawk Surveys in the Bay Area

July 01, 2004 by Christine Sculati

At the sight of a diving juvenile Cooper’s hawk, “the squirrel reared back and opened its mouth with its paws

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Disappearance of Native Oaks in the Bay Area

July 01, 2004 by Christine Sculati

Although solidly rooted in California’s natural and cultural history, our native oaks are disappearing at an alarming rate. The loss

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Peninsula Open Space Trust Acquires Rancho Canada Del Oro

July 01, 2004 by Christine Sculati

Hikers and equestrians can find a new swath of accessible open space in the bucolic eastern foothills of the Santa

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Quail Ridge Wilderness Conservancy

July 01, 2004 by Christine Sculati

Purple needlegrass may soon gain recognition as one of California’s official state symbols, like the golden poppy, our state flower

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Fruits of the Forest

July 01, 2004 by Sue Rosenthal

The classic image of a redwood forest is one of stately tall trees, dense shade, and lots of green. The

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In the Shadow of Giants

July 01, 2004 by Gordy Slack

The hills above Oakland once held some of the largest redwoods ever seen, one estimated at 31 feet in diameter. Ten million years ago, such trees towered over much of North America. Nothing in this long history prepared them for the coming of men, armed with axes and saws, who felled all of Oakland’s redwoods in just 15 years. But even second- and third-growth redwood forests hold their charms, not to mention the subtle suggestions of the forests they can once again become. And you don’t have to go too far from downtown Oakland to find them.

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Dredging up an Avian Oasis

July 01, 2004 by Bill O’Brien

What do you get when you scoop up 250,000 cubic yards of muck from the Petaluma River? Prime shorebird habitat, of course. Unlikely as it may seem, Shollenberger Park is a place where birders have spotted 150 bird species, from nesting avocets and stilts to harriers and egrets. And a new addition to the park will make it one of the largest publicly accessible stretches of wetlands in the Bay Area.

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Saving El Palo Alto

July 01, 2004 by Cindy Spring

Imagine a landmark so prominent that anyone looking south from San Francisco or north from San Jose could spot it.

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