Oct-Dec 2002

 

Issue Content

Ring Around the Bay

October 01, 2002 by Irene Barnard

San Francisco Bay is our largest open space, yet much of its shoreline has long been off-limits. Twelve years ago, the Bay Trail Project set out to change all that by creating a 400-mile ring of multiuse paths around the Bay. Now half complete, the Bay Trail is fulfilling its promise of increased access to […]

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Book Review: Birding at the Bottom of the Bay

October 01, 2002 by Margarita Kloss

by the members of the Santa Clara Audubon Society Santa Clara Valley Audubon Society, 2002 152 pages, $14.50 This little book, which describes 54 promising spots for bird-watching in Santa Clara County, is a great tool that is unique in conception and quite useful both in the field and at home. The knowledge assembled in […]

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Book Review: Cal Alive! Exploring Biodiversity

October 01, 2002 by Margarita Kloss

California Institute for Biodiversity, 2002 Professional Edition (3 CD-ROMs, classroom guide, poster), $250 Lite Edition (1 CD-ROM, no classroom guide), $50 To learn about the vast variety of life in California, it would be best to pack up the car, traipse around the state, and visit all the habitats and biomes to study them firsthand. […]

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Book Review: Caught in Fading Light

October 01, 2002 by Carolyn Brown

by Gary Thorp Walker & Co., 2002 174 pages, $19 (800) 218-9367 They say that seekers are not finders. Marin author and Zen Buddhist Gary Thorp dedicates himself fully to the process of seeking a mountain lion in the wilds of west Marin—not to kill or study or even photograph the elusive creature, but simply […]

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Book Review: The Habitat Garden Book: Wildlife Landscaping for the San Francisco Bay Region

October 01, 2002 by Margarita Kloss

by Nancy BauerCoyote Ridge Press, 200156 pages, $14.95(707) 829-3910 In The Habitat Garden Book, Nancy Bauer deftly paints her philosophy: gardening for wildlife by creating habitats. Most books give instructions for attracting one type of critter at a time, usually birds or butterflies. Or they might tell how to negotiate a coexistence between wildlife and […]

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Book Review: Inland Fishes of California

October 01, 2002 by Margarita Kloss

by Peter Moyle University of California Press, 2002 502 pages, $70 In this revision of his 1976 classic, biologist Peter Moyle has once again collected in one place the information available on California’s inland fishes and created a masterful snapshot of the state’s fisheries. Not a field guide that you can stuff into your back […]

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Book Review: Inventory of Rare and Endangered Plants of California

October 01, 2002 by Margarita Kloss

by the Rare Plant Scientific Advisory Committee; David P. Tibor, Convening Editor California Native Plant Society, 2001 388 pages, $29.95 According to the California Native Plant Society (CNPS), approximately 6,300 native flowering plants, ferns and allies, and gymnosperms grace California, along with about 750 mosses, liverworts, and hornworts. This is more than found in the […]

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Book Review: New Bay Area Trail Guides

October 01, 2002 by Tatiana Siegel

100 Hikes in the San Francisco Bay Area, by Marc J. Soares (The Mountaineers Books, 2001, 239 pages, $15.95) has something for everyone, from the novice to the serious hiker. Organized into seven regions, the guide offers trail distance, estimated hiking time, elevation gain, and degree of difficulty, among other useful facts. From easy routes […]

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Book Review: The New Economy of Nature: The Quest to Make Conservation Profitable

October 01, 2002 by Tatiana Siegel

by Gretchen C. Daily and Katherine Ellison Island Press, 2002 260 pages, $25 Hell hath no fury like a pent-up river. Or at least that’s what residents in the city of Napa learned after living for so many years on the floodplain of the Napa River—a body of water that frequently rebelled against its many […]

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Book Review: Pacific High: Adventures in the Coast Ranges from Baja to Alaska

October 01, 2002 by Tatiana Siegel

by Tim Palmer Island Press, 2002 468 pages, $28 So often in literature, mountains have served as backdrop—a sturdy, all-purpose scene-setter. But in Tim Palmer’s Pacific High, the mountains don’t just provide scenery. They’re the main characters. Chronicling his nine-month odyssey along the Pacific Coast Range, Palmer surveys the astonishing landscape, and in the process […]

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Book Review: Wildflowers of Monterey County: A Field Companion

October 01, 2002 by Margarita Kloss

by David J. Gubernick (photography) and Vern Yadon (commentary and data) Pacific Grove Museum of Natural History and Carmel Publishing Co., 2002 198 pages, $28 (800) 731-3322 This visually seductive book is organized around the six botanical regions of Monterey County, with a single page devoted to each flower. The opulent full-page, full-color photographs are […]

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A Bird’s Eye View of San Francisco Bay

October 01, 2002 by Gregg Elliott

What makes the Bay such a magnet for shorebirds and waterfowl, hosting more of them than any other Pacific coastal wetland in the U.S.? Looking at some of the Bay’s habitats through the eyes of four different species gives us a unique perspective on this avian haven.

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Aerial Photography Exhibition

October 01, 2002 by Sara Marcellino

To explain present-day landscape processes and predict future changes to the land, scientists look back into history to track the continually evolving relationship of land use to landscape change. One of the most effective ways to do this is through aerial photography. In the early 1920s, pioneering aerial photographer George E. Russell began documenting San […]

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Bioneers Conference

October 01, 2002 by Sara Marcellino

Thousands of activists, artists, citizens, scientists, and writers will come together this fall at the 13th annual Bioneers Conference, held at the Marin Center in San Rafael from October 18-20. Seeking a new paradigm for a healthy environment and sustainable world, these visionaries will discuss practical solutions for our most pressing environmental and social challenges. […]

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Brower Youth Awards

October 01, 2002 by Sara Marcellino

One of the most inspiring leaders of our time, David Brower, mentored four generations of future environmentalists throughout his distinguished career, showing us how to take meaningful action to combat environmental problems. Brower directed the Sierra Club, created Earth Island Institute, advocated for the creation of Point Reyes National Seashore, and helped save much of […]

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California Native Plant Society Plant Sales

October 01, 2002 by Sara Marcellino

Calling all lovers of native trees, shrubs, perennials, bulbs, and seeds! With the advent of the rainy season, fall is an excellent time to plant natives: Moist soil gives roots a much better opportunity to grow deeply without frequent watering. Perhaps that’s why many chapters of the California Native Plant Society (CNPS) hold plant sales […]

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Christmas Bird Count

October 01, 2002 by Sara Marcellino

The holidays will soon be upon us, which means it’s time to gather with friends and family to celebrate the season. Perhaps you’d like to add another get-together to the schedule—the Bay Area Christmas Bird Counts (CBC), a tradition since the 1930s. Here’s how it works: Volunteers organize into teams to cover selected areas 15 […]

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Clean Water Act’s 30th Anniversary

October 01, 2002 by Sara Marcellino

The status of San Francisco Bay is of immense importance to our health and well-being. Keeping the Bay—and all other local waterways—clean remains a constant challenge, as more people come to live around its shores. October 18, 2002, marks the 30th anniversary of the federal Clean Water Act, a milestone in the fight to protect […]

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Oakland Museum Exhibition: Wild Wings

October 01, 2002 by Sara Marcellino

Autumn brings the return of many thousands of waterfowl and shorebirds to the Bay Area. This fall, you’ll find many of these birds, or at least their likenesses, inside the Oakland Museum of California. An upcoming exhibit, “Wild Wings: The Waterfowl Art of Harry Curieux Adamson,” will feature 45 oil paintings by this Bay Area […]

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Red-Legged Frog Protected Near Morgan Territory

October 01, 2002 by Sara Marcellino

The federally listed California red-legged frog received some good news recently: A portion of its riparian habitat—shaded by many old sycamore, oak, and bay trees—won’t be developed, thanks to Save Mount Diablo (SMD). Having disappeared from more than three-quarters of its historic range, today this native frog—once the most populous in the state—is found in […]

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Sudden Oak Death Update, Oak Art Benefit

October 01, 2002 by Sara Marcellino

The aggressive pathogen Phytophthora ramorum that causes Sudden Oak Death (SOD) continues to spread, adversely affecting more and more oak trees in the Bay Area and throughout the west. This past summer, the California Department of Food and Agriculture announced that SOD had been found in Contra Costa and Humboldt Counties. The Contra Costa confirmations […]

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Yosemite National Institutes

October 01, 2002 by Sara Marcellino

One way to foster the development of future environmental heroes is to expose young people to the wonders of the natural world. To that end, numerous organizations around the Bay Area empower children and families to get outside and explore. One of them is the Yosemite National Institutes (YNI), a 30-year-old organization dedicated to providing […]

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Letter from the Publisher

October 01, 2002 by David Loeb

In mid-1997, as Malcolm Margolin and I were meeting weekly to figure out how to launch a magazine about nature in the Bay Area, we received some excellent advice: Produce a sample of the magazine to show potential funders and collaborators what we had in mind. We knew that having a knockout cover image for […]

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What, and where, are the oldest rocks in the Bay Area?

October 01, 2002 by Doris Sloan

A: The oldest rocks in the Bay Area are metamorphic rocks associated with the granitic rocks at Point Reyes, Bodega Head, and Montara Mountain. They have traveled a long way in space and time to get here. They all occur west of the San Andreas Fault on the Salinian Block, which is attached to the […]

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Ring Around the Bay

October 01, 2002 by Irene Barnard

San Francisco Bay is our largest open space, yet much of its shoreline has long been off-limits. Twelve years ago, the Bay Trail Project set out to change all that by creating a 400-mile ring of multiuse paths around the Bay. Now half complete, the Bay Trail is fulfilling its promise of increased access to the expansive vistas, rich wildlife habitats, and recreational opportunities of this incomparable estuary.

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The Call of the Rails

October 01, 2002 by Rosemary Lombard

The Bay Trail through the Palo Alto Baylands is among the best places to see the endangered California clapper rail and multitudes of other shorebirds.

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Starry, Starry Night

October 01, 2002 by Linda Watanabe McFerrin

We humans have evolved to be outside in the daylight. But there are delights awaiting those who venture forth at night. Revel in the cosmic mysteries of the star-filled sky, and open your senses to the shadowy world of nature’s night shift.

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