Oct-Dec 2003

 

Issue Content

Toward a Healthy Bay

October 01, 2003 by Bay Nature

In the 40 years since the movement to save San Francisco Bay began, we have moved from desperately fending off more bay fill projects to proactively restoring thousands of acres of shoreline wetlands. Yet how healthy is the Bay that we are saving? What are the factors that affect the health of the Bay and […]

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Book Review: 101 Great Hikes of the San Francisco Bay Area

October 01, 2003 by Christine Sculati

by Ann Marie Brown, Foghorn Outdoors, 2003, 340 pages, $17.95 (www.foghorn.com).   Visually engaging and rich in information, this second addition of 101 Great Hikes presents trail descriptions written with the ardor of a naturalist. Divided into sections on Napa and Sonoma, Marin, East Bay, and Peninsula and South Bay, this guide features vivid write-ups […]

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Book Review: A Dangerous Place

October 01, 2003 by Tatiana Siegel

by Marc Reisner, Pantheon Books, 2003, 181 pages, $22.   Don’t let the hyperinflated housing market fool you. The Bay Area is sit-uated atop some of the most seismically unappealing real estate in the world. In fact, the nine-county region has the highest density of earthquake faults per square kilometer of any metropolitan area in […]

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Book Review: Before California

October 01, 2003 by Tracy Held

by Brian Fagan, Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2003, 288 pages, $24.95 (www.altamirapress.com).   In this new book archaeologist Brian Fagan succeeds in compiling various ele-ments of the history of California before European settlement, including archaeological discoveries, ecological changes, and anthropologic developments. Fagan’s device of including us in his tales of California’s “prehistory” works well to […]

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Book Review: California Coastal Access Guide

October 01, 2003 by Matthew Bettelheim

6th Edition, by the California Coastal Commission, University of California Press, 2003, 304 pages, $22.50 (www.ucpress.edu).   If you love to hike the coastline, visit tidepools or simply get your feet wet in the surf, make a place on your shelf for the latest edition of the Coastal Conservancy’s guide to the California coast. A […]

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Book Review: Exploring Point Reyes National Seashore and Golden Gate National Recreation Area

October 01, 2003 by Christine Sculati

by Tracy Salcedo-Chourré, Globe Pequot Press, 2003, 318 pages, $16.95 (www.falcon.com).   This new book covers two of the Bay Area’s finest public open space treasures, where beaches, coves, undulating terrain, and dramatic seascapes provide oppor-tunities for discovery any time of the year. Tracy Salcedo-Chourré piques your adventurous spirit with trail descriptions and information on […]

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Book Review: Plants of the San Francisco Bay Region: Mendocino to Monterey

October 01, 2003 by Irene Barnard

by Linda H. Beidleman and Eugene N. Kozloff, University of California Press, 2003, 505 pages, $29.95 (www.ucpress.edu).   Linda H. Beidleman, an instructor at UC Berkeley’s Jepson Herbarium, and Eugene N. Kozloff, a professor at University of Washington, have put together a revised edition of Plants of the San Francisco Bay Region: Mendocino to Monterey. […]

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Book Review: San Francisco Bay: Portrait of an Estuary

October 01, 2003 by Sierra Senyak

by John Hart (text) and David Sanger (photography), University of California Press, 2003, 212 pages, $34.95 (www.ucpress.edu).   Early European explorers sailed right past the mouth of the San Francisco Bay; blinded by sun or fog, or perhaps the monotony of a thousand miles of mountainous coastline, they missed what John Hart calls “the chink […]

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Book Review: Sharks, Rays, and Chimaeras of California

October 01, 2003 by Lorraine Rath

by David A. Ebert (text) and Matthew D. Squillante (illustrations), University of California Press, 2003, 284 pages, $19.95 (www.ucpress.edu).   Bat rays. Great whites. Ratfishes. Mantas. Who isn’t at least a little fascinated by sharks and their cartilaginous kin? They not only stir our imaginations, but with 68 species of these chondrichthyans inhabiting the waters […]

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Book Review: Trail Runner’s Guide San Francisco Bay Area

October 01, 2003 by Sierra Senyak

by Jessica Lage, Wilderness Press, 2003, 308 pages, $17.95 (www.wildernesspress.com).   Author Jessica Lage must have worn out many pairs of running shoes while researching her Trail Runner’s Guide. This guide, the first of its kind to cover the Bay Area, features trails in San Francisco, the Peninsula, Marin, and the East Bay. Each entry […]

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Book Review: Introduction to Trees of the San Francisco Bay Region

October 01, 2003 by Irene Barnard

by Glenn Keator, University of California Press, 2002, 251 pages, $14.95 (www.ucpress.edu).   Bay Area botanist Glenn Keator, author of The Life of an Oak: An Intimate Portrait (Heyday Books, 1998), has now assembled the well-written, easy-to-use Introduction to Trees of the San Francisco Bay Region. The guide is part of UC Press’s venerable California […]

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California Native Plant Link Exchange

October 01, 2003 by Leah Messinger

When John Malpas inherited a small piece of land in Mendocino County, he discovered an overgrown tangle of exotic English ivy and blue gum eucalyptus obscuring an underlayer of dead native trees and shrubs. As Malpas began the challenging task of ascertaining which plants were native to his part of Northern California and then locating […]

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Crystal Springs Trail Open To Public

October 01, 2003 by Leah Messinger

The Bay Area Ridge Trail Council and the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) are encouraging the public to get involved with the newly opened Fifield-Cahill Trail in San Mateo County. After more than 30 years of community pressure to allow public access to the open space above the Crystal Springs reservoir, the SFPUC has […]

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Lodi Crane Festival

October 01, 2003 by Leah Messinger

Fall marks the height of bird migrations along the Pacific Flyway. And while the Bay Area has plenty of birds to see, you’ll have to head a bit farther east to see the spectacular sandhill cranes that winter in the Central Valley. After the long journey from Canada, Alaska, and Siberia, greater and lesser sandhill […]

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Marine Sonar Controversy

October 01, 2003 by Leah Messinger

Marine reserves would probably not protect whales and other ocean mammals from the severe acoustic trauma of submarine-detecting Low-Frequency Active (LFA) sonar—which transmits sounds of up to 215 decibels. The good news on this front is the recent decision by Judge Elizabeth Laporte of the Northern District Court of California barring the Navy from greatly […]

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Monarch Day at Natural Bridges

October 01, 2003 by Leah Messinger

To see slightly more diminutive returning migrants, head south on Sunday, October 12, for Welcome Back Monarchs Day at Natural Bridges State Beach in Santa Cruz. By mid-October, the butterflies have begun to arrive from as far away as 2,000 miles, to winter at the beach’s National Butterfly Reserve. There, as many as 150,000 monarchs […]

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Ocean Awareness Campaign

October 01, 2003 by Leah Messinger

As thousands of monarchs return to the protection of the California State Park system, a coalition of marine conservation organizations wants to remind Americans that less than one percent of the world’s ocean waters benefit from such government-administered refuges. The Less Than One media campaign is a joint effort of the conservation organization SeaWeb and […]

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State of the Estuary

October 01, 2003 by Leah Messinger

The past two decades have witnessed an explosion of scientific studies of the San Francisco Bay estuary, vastly improving our understanding of its natural history and ecology. Every two years the San Francisco Estuary Project brings together researchers, government officials, advocates, and the general public to share the results of the groundbreaking work being done […]

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Stavocet/Avostilt

October 01, 2003 by Leah Messinger

While you’re exploring the Bay Area this fall, keep your eyes open for the new bird on the Bay. Ten years after Jim Rosso’s initial sighting, San Francisco Bay Bird Observatory Intern Biologist Robin Dakin and photographer David Cardinal recently spotted what appears to be a hybrid of the American avocet and the black-necked stilt. […]

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Letter from the Publisher

October 01, 2003 by David Loeb

If you look down at street drains at certain spots in Berkeley, you’ll notice stenciled onto the curb words to the effect of “Do Not Dump. Drains to Bay.” Of course, virtually everything around here (except the Pacific-facing slope of the outer coast range) “drains to Bay.” In fact, 40% of the land surface of […]

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Life on Black Mountain

October 01, 2003 by David Weintraub

Q: Getting permission to live in a cabin on Black Mountain Ranch (in the hills east of Palo Alto) in 1975 must have been pretty exciting for a graduate student with a young family. A: I was working on a degree in geophysics at Stanford and I wanted to place some instruments on Monte Bello […]

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Midpeninsula Regional Open Space District

October 01, 2003 by David Weintraub

The Midpeninsula Regional Open Space District (MROSD, or “the District”) was formed by voters in 1972 to create and preserve a greenbelt in the Santa Cruz Mountains that would help provide a scenic backdrop for the rapidly growing communities of the San Francisco Peninsula. Initially approved in northwestern Santa Clara County, the District’s boundaries were […]

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Peninsula Treasure

October 01, 2003 by David Weintraub

This former home of Italian winemakers, a ’70s commune, and a recluse named Indian Joe saw its share of history before being acquired by the Midpeninsula Regional Open Space District. Now it boasts its fair share of easily accessible geological anomalies, diverse wildlife, and spectacular views.

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The Essential Tree

October 01, 2003 by Gordy Slack

It’s almost impossible to imagine the California landscape without oak woodlands. But this most familiar and prolific habitat faces a number of serious threats, including unchecked suburban development and Sudden Oak Death. Fortunately, many parks in the Bay Area, including those of the East Bay Regional Parks, offer welcome refuge for a variety of oak woodlands.

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Bay Related Organizations

October 01, 2003 by Bay Nature Staff

There are many local organizations working to protect, restore, explore, and educate about San Francisco Bay. Many of them welcome volunteers and new members. We found close to one hundred of these organizations in our search, but there are undoubtedly some that were inadvertently left off the following list. Acterra 3921 East Bayshore Rd. Palo […]

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Experience the Bay

October 01, 2003 by Matthew Bettelheim

Swimmers plunge into the Bay at Aquatic Park for the swim to Alcatraz and back. Photo by Charles Kennard. The best way to appreciate San Francisco Bay is to experience it firsthand. There’s nothing like getting some spray on your cheeks, some wind in your hair, and some sand in your shorts to help put […]

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Four Threats to a Healthy Bay

October 01, 2003 by Jane Kay

Habitat Loss On the fringes of the Bay lie the varied wetlands that feed and shelter the Bay’s wildlife. Chinook salmon, white croaker, and northern pintails feed in the shallow water as it fluctuates with the tides. Topsmelt, Pacific staghorn sculpin, and brine shrimp thrive in salt ponds that cover large portions of former tidal […]

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Toward A Healthy Bay

October 01, 2003 by Jane Kay

In the 40 years since the movement to save San Francisco Bay began, we have moved from desperately fending off more bay fill projects to proactively restoring thousands of acres of shoreline wetlands. Yet how healthy is the Bay that we are saving? What are the factors that affect the health of the Bay and what are we doing about them?

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