Latest from Crown Memorial Regional Shoreline

Crown Memorial Regional Shoreline

July 08, 2012 by Bay Nature Staff

The largest beach on the Bay is in Alameda, a favorite for swimmers, birders, and wind and kite surfers. ...

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A Classroom in the Woods

January 01, 2011 by Joan Hamilton

The East Bay Regional Park District is not just the nation's largest and oldest regional park district. It also has what’s likely the largest corps of professional naturalists of any local park agency. For generations of kids, that's meant accessible opportunities for hiking, camping, getting dirty, and--most important--discovering the outdoors and getting to know our plant and animal neighbors.

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The Grunion’s One-Night Stand in the Sand

April 01, 2008 by Christopher Richard

Solstice is nigh, the tide is high, the full moon illuminates the midnight beach, and before us, thousands of glimmering ...

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A Shore Thing

October 01, 2007 by Lisa Owens-Viani

The East Bay shoreline is strung like a necklace with more than a dozen parks, from the bluffs of Point Pinole near Richmond to the sandy beach and shallow waters of Alameda’s Crown Beach to the salt marshes near Coyote Hills. The place where water meets land is a magnet for life of many kinds, and these parks are no exception: recreational destination for joggers, swimmers, and windsurfers; home for leopard sharks, bat rays, and crabs; wintertime smorgasbord for thousands of shorebirds. Turn back the clock a few decades, and you would have found garbage dumps or dynamite factories here. Skip back a few more decades, and you would find thriving aquatic ecosystems. You can still see traces of all of this and more at the shoreline parks of the East Bay Regional Park District.

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Nature at the Table

July 01, 2007 by Chris Clarke

On summer weekends, the nearly 4,000 picnic tables of the East Bay Regional Park District are packed with families from many of the Bay Area's diverse communities, returning year after year to their favorite spots, along with great blue herons hunting gophers, crows and ravens pillaging trash cans, and raccoons swiping meat right off the grill. All just part of the curious ecology of our local picnic areas.

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