Latest from Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge

San Francisco Bay Wildlife Society

July 20, 2012 by Bay Nature

The San Francisco Bay Wildlife Society is a non-profit supporting the education, interpretation, and research activities of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The primary mission of SFBWS is to promote public awareness and appreciation of the San Francisco Bay and its natural history, and to conserve and preserve the remaining bay lands as essential wildlife habitat. In addition the Society works to improve opportunities for low-impact public use; operates a bookstore and visitor center at the Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge; and funds educational events, research, and exhibits.

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Citizens Committee to Complete the Refuge

July 20, 2012 by Bay Nature

The mission of the Committee is to save the Bay's remaining wetlands by working to place them under the protection of the Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge, and to foster world-wide education regarding the value of all wetlands.

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Don Edwards SF Bay National Wildlife Refuge – Fremont

July 08, 2012 by Bay Nature Staff

This refuge, the largest urban wildlife refuge in the country, hosts over 280 species of birds each year over a ...

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Don Edwards National Wildlife Refuge – Alviso

July 08, 2012 by Bay Nature Staff

This refuge, the largest urban wildlife refuge in the country, hosts over 280 species of birds each year over a ...

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A Happy Return for Bird’s Beak

April 01, 2011 by Erica Reder

It’s always nice to see plants and wildlife return to a restored site. But it’s especially nice when a plant that’s both rare and finicky shows up in a spot miles away from the nearest remaining population. That’s what happened when Point Reyes bird’s beak appeared at LaRiviere Marsh near Newark.

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Out at the Weep

July 01, 2009 by Bay Nature

Using kite-mounted cameras and field microscopes, an architecture professor and a retired microbiologist have uncovered surprising diversity in an unassuming ditch next to a railroad grade that cuts across the South Bay salt ponds near Alviso. From vivid oranges laced with bird tracks to bright greens bubbling with oxygen exhaled by cyanobacteria, there's complexity and wonder waiting at the Weep, from several hundred feet in the air down to the microscopic level.

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Warm Springs Unit Expansion

July 01, 2008 by Aleta George

With no April showers, the largest vernal pool in the Warm Springs Unit of the Don Edwards San Francisco Bay ...

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New Golf Course in Menlo Park

January 01, 2006 by Aleta George

After hearing testimony from 89 speakers, bleary-eyed Menlo Park city council members voted 3 to 2 on November 1 to ...

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Man in the Mud

October 01, 2004 by Lisa Owens-Viani

Since immigrating to the United States from Norway in the 1950s, Hallvard Haugnes spent almost every day of his life ...

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A Tall Order

October 01, 2004 by Glen Martin

There are many factors to consider—from endangered species and sediment deficits to flood control and budget deficits—when you restore 16,500 acres of salt ponds.

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