Latest from Farallon Islands

Of Mice and Birds at the Farallones

May 26, 2011 by Juliet Grable

U.S. Fish and Wildlife officials extended to June 10 the deadline for accepting public comments on a controversial proposal to eradicate nonnative house mice on the Southeast Farallon Islands. Opponents cite concerns that the poisons will endanger a range of wildlife on or near the islands, while proponents say the project will help threatened seabirds and the island ecosystem.

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Feds Seek Comment on Farallones Mouse-eradication Plan

May 11, 2011 by Juliet Grable

Now extended through June 10, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is seeking comment on a plan to use rodenticides to eradicate non-native house mice from the South Farallon Islands. Officials say the mice threaten nesting seabirds, but critics charge that the effort could actually endanger birds on the island.

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A Squabble of Gulls

October 01, 2010 by Joe Eaton

Gulls don’t inspire the awe that a golden eagle or red-tailed hawk does. Or the affection we feel for hummingbirds. But the Bay Area’s dozen gull species  are true survivors: Adaptable, voracious predators, they breed by the thousands in the South Bay and at the Farallones, and it takes some determined biologists to keep an eye on them.

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The Long, Slow Spill of the Luckenbach

July 01, 2010 by Aleta George

We don’t even have a word for an oil spill that drags out over five decades, but that’s just what happened with one ship that sank off the Golden Gate. Now, funds are flowing to help mend the damage.

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Charting Climate Change on the Central Coast

June 07, 2010 by Lester Rowntree

The Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary, along with its sister sanctuaries to the north and south, Cordell Banks and Monterey Bay, are sentinels for the effects of global warming on ocean waters. And, as documented in a new report released, Central California's offshore waters and coastline are already showing the effects of global warming.

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Beyond Jaws

January 01, 2010 by Glen Martin

Fast, silent, and deadly, the great white shark has long evoked both fear and awe among those who live, work, and play along the California coast. Yet for all its press--both good and bad--we've known remarkably little about the life of this iconic creature. But recent scientific studies using pioneering tracking techniques are finally giving us a better look at the white shark's wide-ranging haunts and habits.

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Whales at the Farallon Islands

July 11, 2008 by Jessica Taekman

Picture hungry tourists swarming around an all-you-can-eat buffet. Only the tourists are 100 feet long and weigh almost 200,000 pounds. These are blue whales, the largest animals ever, and they've come to feast on some of the tiniest animals on the planet: millions upon millions of tiny shrimplike krill.

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Diving into Our Ocean Sanctuaries

October 01, 2007 by David Lukas

While living for a while on the Monterey Peninsula, I found myself drawn time and again from the cafes and shops of Pacific Grove down to the waters of Monterey Bay. Sometimes I would just sit on a bench and look for sea otters resting and feeding their pups in the undulating kelp beds. My time in Monterey was a small but privileged window into the wonderful diversity that makes the central coast of California one of the richest marine ecosystems in the world...

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Los Farallones

October 01, 2007 by Matthew Bettelheim

The eggers of the Farallon Islands

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A Moveable Feast

July 01, 2007 by Kathleen M. Wong

Fog rolling over Twin Peaks may not seem like a boon for salmon, sea lions, and blue whales, but it is. Coastal upwelling is the phenomenon that brings nutrient-rich colder water to the ocean surface just off our coast most every spring and summer, and that means fog for us and plenty of food for everything from phytoplankton to humpback whales.

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