Latest from land management

San Mateo County Resource Conservation District

July 20, 2012 by Bay Nature

A nonregulatory public benefit district to help people protect, conserve, and restore natural resources through information, education, and technical assistance programs.

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San Mateo County Parks

July 20, 2012 by Bay Nature

Operates 17 separate parks, three regional trails, and other county and local trails encompassing 15,680 acres.

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Contra Costa Resource Conservation District

July 20, 2012 by Bay Nature

The mission of the Contra Costa Resource Conservation District (RCD) is to provide an organized means for land managers and local community members to play a prominent role in carrying out voluntary, cooperative conservation programs that promote the sustainable and productive use of natural resources.

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Alameda County Resource Conservation District – ACRCD

July 20, 2012 by Bay Nature

The Alameda County Resource Conservation District provides technical and educational services for natural resource conservation and agriculture enhancement. Collaborates with private landowners, local, state, and federal agencies and other organizations to develop and implement various conservation and agricultural strategies.

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The Keeper of the Waters

July 01, 2008 by Cindy Spring

Gayle Ciardi, the first woman to serve as a watershed keeper for the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission, is the fourth-generation of her family to work on the SFPUC watershed.

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The Saved and the Dammed

July 01, 2008 by Sarah Sweedler

For better and worse, the upper reach of the Pilarcitos watershed on the Peninsula was dammed to supply water to San Francisco in the 1860s. The surrounding land has been protected and kept off-limits to the public ever since, allowing rare species to thrive here. That includes the marbled murrelet, which nests only in old-growth conifers, such as Douglas fir. But the dam and other impacts also leave less water in the creek for oceangoing steelhead. Now, a diverse group of stakeholders has come together to chart a brighter future for the fish and the creek.

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Wild Gardens

January 01, 2006 by Beverly R. Ortiz

A visit to remnant native grasslands in Richmond or diverse oak woodlands in eastern Alameda County gives a taste of our region’s native habitats. But few of us are aware of an important element that helped shape those habitats: the regimes of burning, pruning, and digging carried out over centuries by the East Bay’s indigenous inhabitants, some of whom still carry on those traditions today.

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