Latest from plate tectonics

US Geological Survey – Earth Science Info Center

July 20, 2012 by Bay Nature

Western Region Geography conducts science projects that provide information and analyses that help people and policymakers make informed decisions about issues that have roots in the interactions people have with their environment.

No Comments

Walking the Line

October 01, 2008 by Horst Rademacher

It was 140 years ago, in October 1868, that the Hayward Fault unleashed the magnitude 6.8 temblor that put the fault on the map. The quake shook the entire region and virtually leveled the then-small hamlets of Hayward and San Leandro. Now, the land along the fault line is among the most densely populated in the region, a sobering situation given the likelihood of a repeat performance in the near future. But despite their destructive potential, the Hayward and the Bay Area’s other faults are the driving force behind our region’s varied and beautiful topography. Understanding how they work is key both to understanding our local landscapes and to preparing for the next Big One.

No Comments

In the Fault Zone

April 01, 2006 by Horst Rademacher

On April 18, 1906, a massive earthquake centered just west of San Francisco ruptured the earth from Humboldt to San Juan Bautista. While the more dramatic traces of this 7.8 temblor may be hard to find one hundred years later, the tectonic forces that moved the earth that day are still relentlessly shaping our young and active landscape, carrying us towards another cataclysm in the near future.

No Comments

On The Move

April 01, 2006 by Doris Sloan

All of the familiar landforms we see here in the Bay Area—ridges, cliffs, lakes, and even San Francisco Bay itself—are products of the same titanic encounters between tectonic plates that produce our frequent quakes. Through a geologist’s trained eye, we learn to interpret the signs these forces have left on the land around us.

No Comments

 
 
1