Latest from PRBO Conservation Science

Fur Seals Making a Comeback on the Farallones

October 05, 2011 by Juliet Grable

Recent surveys on the Farallones show that the islands’ cute, feisty fur seals continue to make a comeback, more than a century after the West Coast population was hunted nearly to extinction.

2 Comments

State of the Birds: People Are a Threat, and Promise

October 01, 2011 by Aleta George

A new report on the state of bird populations shows mixed results for Bay Area populations. People continue to be the biggest threat, with habitat loss and other pressures, and the biggest hope, in the form of major and minor restoration projects all around the Bay.

No Comments

First Day of Ocean Research Tour Finds Red Tide Rather Than Whales

September 27, 2011 by Aleta George

Marine scientists gathering data off the Golden Gate have zeroed in on a number of hotspots of biodiversity, including transects north and south of the Farallon Islands. Turns out, though, that even hot spots aren’t so hot when a toxic red tide rolls in.

1 Comment

Of Mice and Birds at the Farallones

May 26, 2011 by Juliet Grable

U.S. Fish and Wildlife officials extended to June 10 the deadline for accepting public comments on a controversial proposal to eradicate nonnative house mice on the Southeast Farallon Islands. Opponents cite concerns that the poisons will endanger a range of wildlife on or near the islands, while proponents say the project will help threatened seabirds and the island ecosystem.

No Comments

Kids Counting Birds in the Canal

January 19, 2011 by Juliet Grable

The annual Christmas Bird Count is the longest-running bird study in the world. But it’s not exactly kid-friendly. So Wendy Dalia of Richardson Bay Audubon Center spearheaded Marin County’s first-ever youth Christmas Bird Count on January 8. She’s already looking forward to next year.

No Comments

A Squabble of Gulls

October 01, 2010 by Joe Eaton

Gulls don’t inspire the awe that a golden eagle or red-tailed hawk does. Or the affection we feel for hummingbirds. But the Bay Area’s dozen gull species  are true survivors: Adaptable, voracious predators, they breed by the thousands in the South Bay and at the Farallones, and it takes some determined biologists to keep an eye on them.

1 Comment

Beyond Jaws

January 01, 2010 by Glen Martin

Fast, silent, and deadly, the great white shark has long evoked both fear and awe among those who live, work, and play along the California coast. Yet for all its press–both good and bad–we’ve known remarkably little about the life of this iconic creature. But recent scientific studies using pioneering tracking techniques are finally giving us a better look at the white shark’s wide-ranging haunts and habits.

2 Comments

Kids Learn the Landscape in San Rafael

November 20, 2009 by Maria Vierra

On Veteran’s Day, a day off when lots of kids might be home watching TV or playing video games, fourth and fifth graders from Bahia Vista Elementary School in San Rafael’s Canal district guided parents and friends through the four distinct bird habitats of Pickleweed Park and explained what they had learned about each habitat and its particular bird life.

No Comments

Protecting Plovers

April 01, 2009 by Aleta George

On a gray September day, I walked north on Ocean Beach from Sloat Boulevard to the Cliff House. It was

No Comments

Elephant Seals and Climate Change

March 20, 2009 by Laura Hautala

A new study suggests that warmer ocean temperatures brought on by climate change may permanently skew sex ratios of northern elephant seals, the huge seals that visit a few Bay Area locations to breed.

No Comments

 
 
123