Latest from prehistory

Black Coal, Bright Flowers

April 01, 2008 by Horst Rademacher

The peaceful hills of Black Diamond Mines Regional Preserve weren’t always so: One hundred twenty years ago, you’d have found bustling towns full of miners and their families and, nearby, the mine works and railroads that carried out tons of coal and sand, feeding the booming industries of Northern California. Today, the park offers grand vistas, abundant wildflowers, and a mine tour that gives an illuminating view of both the work of the miners and the geological history that brought them here and shaped the aboveground landscape.

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Muir Woods Anniversary

April 01, 2008 by John Hart

Though named for legendary conservationist John Muir, Muir Woods National Monument is really the legacy of William Kent, a wealthy landowner and politician. His gift to the nation 100 years ago of this redwood-lined valley in southwestern Marin, containing the last significant old-growth stands in the county, meant that millions of visitors from around the region and the world would get to witness these magnificent trees. The park’s anniversary caps a remarkable century of conservation in the Bay Area.

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Where the Elk and the Antelope Played

January 01, 2004 by David Rains Wallace

A million years ago, in a climate much like ours today, the land around an ancestral bay teemed with large animals: mammoths and saber-tooth cats; bears, horses, and peccaries. By 300 years ago, the mammoths were gone, but grizzlies, elk, condor, and pronghorn were abundant.European settlers wiped out many of those animals, but programs to reintroduce some of them are now under way. Which raises the question: What should a healthy, native megafauna look like now?

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Megafauna Resources

January 01, 2004 by Matthew Bettelheim

To learn more about ancient megafauna and efforts to protect and restore the Bay Area’s megafauna:
Megafauna Video
Check out

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