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Bay Nature magazineApril-June 2017

Human History

Human settlement in the San Francisco Bay Area dates back 7,000 years to early Native American settlements. Today, the region is a teeming metropolis of 6 million people that collectively challenge the health of the region’s ecosystems. How it got this way — from Spanish acquisition to the Gold Rush boom and on to contemporary battles over land development — is a story that prompts a deeper understanding of our place in the landscape.

How the East Bay Shoreline Became A Park for the People

March 28, 2017 by Lisa Krieger

A walk through the tumultuous history of the East Bay's popular shoreline park.

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Letter to the Editor: Protecting Diversity Is the Opposite of Xenophobia

February 23, 2017 by Doug Johnson

Some non-native species are okay. But not all of them.

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Old Giants: The Last Days of Oakland’s Redwoods

January 01, 2017 by Sylvia Linsteadt

An excerpt from Sylvia Lindsteadt's Lost Worlds of the San Francisco Bay Area on the logging of the East Bay's redwood trees.

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Dark Treasure: Mount Diablo’s Lost Coal Mines

January 01, 2017 by Sylvia Linsteadt

An excerpt from Sylvia Lindsteadt's Lost Worlds of the San Francisco Bay Area on the lost coal mines of Mount Diablo.

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Bay Area Nature’s All-Hands-On-Deck Moment

January 01, 2017 by David Loeb

The Bay is healthier now than it has been at any time in the past 50 years. And that’s because people in this century decided to work together across disciplines and institutional boundaries to reverse the damage done over the previous two centuries.

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Rue Mapp on Doubling Down on Black Joy in Nature

December 24, 2016 by Rue Mapp

"The story of Outdoor Afro really begins, for me, in my own family."

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Remembering Harold Gilliam

December 19, 2016 by David Loeb

Environmental journalist Harold Gilliam blazed the trail for organizations like Bay Nature.

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Stanford Paleoecologist Elizabeth Hadly Takes on the Future

November 28, 2016 by Mary Ellen Hannibal

Stanford University paleoecologist Elizabeth Hadly, an advisor to Governor Jerry Brown and the new faculty director of the Jasper Ridge Ecological Reserve, looks into the deep past to unlock the future.

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Malcolm Margolin’s Beautiful Life

August 01, 2016 by Eric Simons

One of the Bay Area's master storytellers retires.

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A Shakespearian Classic with a California Landscape Twist: Romeo and Juliet Comes Outdoors to the Petaluma Adobe

July 28, 2016 by Elizabeth Rogers

The We Players theater group performs Romeo and Juliet at the Petaluma Adobe this summer.

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