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Human History

Human settlement in the San Francisco Bay Area dates back 7,000 years to early Native American settlements. Today, the region is a teeming metropolis of 6 million people that collectively challenge the health of the region’s ecosystems. How it got this way — from Spanish acquisition to the Gold Rush boom and on to contemporary battles over land development — is a story that prompts a deeper understanding of our place in the landscape.

The Last Oyster

May 20, 2014 by Sean Greene

The West Coast’s native Olympia oyster serves an important role as an ecosystem builder with its ability to filter the water. But owing to reasons that are still somewhat unclear, over the last few millennia native oysters have largely disappeared from the San Francisco Bay.

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Why Bay Nature?

April 22, 2014 by Bay Nature Staff

Publisher David Loeb had his Bay Nature epiphany while hiking in China Camp State Park. That’s when he conceived of ...

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Nature Below Dolores Park, One Way or Another

April 22, 2014 by Eric Simons

A Dolores Park construction hole filled with water. Was this the clue to an unresolved mystery, and a window into a piece of San Francisco history?

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Map Sense: From Topos to Tablets at the East Bay Regional Parks

January 13, 2014 by John Hart

Every map tells a story -- about the world, and about the person who made it.

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Letter from the Publisher: Watching Mount Diablo Heal Itself

January 13, 2014 by David Loeb

I have a mixed reaction when I hear that a place I know and love has been hit by wildfire. On the one hand, there’s a visceral recoil: Will this cherished place survive? But on the other hand, there’s a thrill that comes from anticipating dramatic changes to a familiar landscape.

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The Man Who Sees the Trash

January 06, 2014 by Eric Simons

Richard James, who keeps the beaches of Point Reyes as litter-free as he can, has an obsessive eye for the discordant note of trash. His life as a park volunteer comes with a lesson: You learn strange things when you pick up after the world.

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Traditional and Modern Methods of Acorn Preparation

December 05, 2013 by Emily Moskal

Bay Area oaks are prolific, but acorn use has diminished within the last 200 years. With the help of modern kitchenware you can rediscover the art of acorn preparation and its rich history grounded in Native American traditions.

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Fording a Troublesome Creek

September 12, 2013 by Beth Slatkin

Playwright Todd Evans Todd Evans aims for cultural and historical authenticity in his plays. His latest work, Troublesome Creek, celebrates ...

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Oakland Museum’s new science gallery opens May 31

May 21, 2013 by Dan Rademacher

On May 31, the Oakland Museum will open its overhauled science gallery, the world's largest museum exhibit focused on California’s habitats and wildlife.

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“Paint slowly and carry a small brush”

April 24, 2013 by Paul Epstein

Artist Jeff Long Internationally acclaimed painter Jeff Long, known primarily for his abstract works, has lately taken up his brush ...

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