From Bay Nature magazineApril-June 2016

Plants and Fungi

From majestic 300-foot redwoods to the luscious black witch’s butter mushroom, the San Francisco Bay Area is alive with plants and fungi. Yet many of these rooted natives are threatened by the twin forces of development and invasive species, making their survival particularly critical for the food web.

Nature Journaling: John Muir Laws and the Art of Slowing Down, Sitting Still, and Paying Attention

April 18, 2016 by John Muir Laws

"As a naturalist, educator, and artist, I have found that my journal is the most necessary tool I carry into the field with me; it is even more necessary than my binoculars."

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In the Third Spring After the Morgan Fire, Just Add Water to Mount Diablo for Flowers

April 15, 2016 by Joan Hamilton

With 38 inches of rain at the top of the mountain since last summer, the bloom has been great all over Mount Diablo.

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Ask the Naturalist: Where are the Flowers on Mount Diablo?

April 15, 2016 by Beth Slatkin

Where to go for spring 2016.

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The Native Plants of the Quiroste Valley

April 01, 2016 by Sue Rosenthal

Better know some of the common plants of the Amah Mutsun world.

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The Livermore Tarweed Lives Happily Ever After(?)

March 14, 2016 by Eric Simons

The Livermore tarweed is indistinct, hairy, and smelly. It is also exceedingly rare and in imminent danger.

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Identifying With Lichen

February 01, 2016 by Elizabeth Lopatto

In which California is the first state to have a state lichen.

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Mike Vasey: The Magic of Manzanitas

January 07, 2016 by Sue Rosenthal

Manzanita expert Mike Vasey wants to share the world of these fascinating shrubs with the public.

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Ask the Naturalist: The Secret of the Slender Redwoods

September 03, 2015 by David Herlocker

Why are some stands of redwoods so spindly? Marin County Parks naturalist David Herlocker explains this anomaly.

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Killer Plant Pathogen Is Widespread at SFPUC’s Alameda County and Peninsula Restoration Sites

July 16, 2015 by Alison Hawkes

Phytophthora tentaculata, a new and particularly pernicious strain of dangerous plant pathogens that has been on a federal watch list, was found throughout one of the SFPUC's restoration sites in central Alameda County.

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Native Plant Nurseries Get Ahead of Dangerous Pathogens

June 29, 2015 by Alison Hawkes

Perhaps the biggest contribution to the fight against phytophthora has been a call to action in the restoration nursery trade.

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