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Bay Nature magazineJuly-September 2017

Plants and Fungi

From majestic 300-foot redwoods to the luscious black witch’s butter mushroom, the San Francisco Bay Area is alive with plants and fungi. Yet many of these rooted natives are threatened by the twin forces of development and invasive species, making their survival particularly critical for the food web.

The “Ivory-Billed Woodpecker of Rare Wildflowers” is Now An Unlikely Symbol of Success in an Era of Extinction

June 28, 2017 by David Rains Wallace

The Mount Diablo Buckwheat disappeared in the 1930s. It was thought to be extinct. A single population was rediscovered in 2005. And then last year botanists found a new population numbering in the millions. How has this rarest of rare plants survived?

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Two Almost Identical Lupines Live in the Same Place. One is Rare, One Not. Why?

June 28, 2017 by Alexander Fox

A new journal article tries to answer an ecological mystery at Point Reyes.

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What Leads to Great Wildflowers? The Formula’s Not Always So Easy.

March 28, 2017 by David Loeb

A lot of rain isn't always the magic formula for flowers.

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As Rainy Winter Spreads Sudden Oak Death Pathogen, a Scientist Races to Build Resistance

March 28, 2017 by Alison Hawkes

A Berkeley researcher studies trees that survive what for most is a death sentence

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Letter to the Editor: Protecting Diversity Is the Opposite of Xenophobia

February 23, 2017 by Doug Johnson

Some non-native species are okay. But not all of them.

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A Story About Once and Future California, Written in the Rings of Redwoods

February 08, 2017 by Lucy Kang

Why would a scientist count a quarter of a million redwood tree rings?

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Naturalist’s Notebook: Good Algae Gone Bad

January 01, 2017 by John Muir Laws

Blue-green algae has made some Bay Area ponds dangerous

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Brightly Colored Parrot Mushrooms Love the Damp Dark Days of Winter

January 01, 2017 by Anna Towers

Parrot mushrooms love the dark days of winter.

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New Science Helps Understand Redwood Ghosts

January 01, 2017 by Alexander Fox

Albino redwood trees, first documented in 1866, have been a mystery for as long as we’ve known they were out there.

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Meet Bay Nature’s 2017 Local Heroes

November 02, 2016 by Bay Nature Staff

Bay Nature Institute announces its 4 Local Hero Award winners for 2017.

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