In the San Francisco Bay Area, slices of nature pop up in the most unexpected places, a testament to the region's wealth in biodiversity and the resilience of its natural systems. Bringing nature to urban areas is not just about ensuring the survival of species, but enhancing people's quality of life through a fulfillment of our innate need to be with nature.

Update: Steelhead on Alameda Creek

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2005 “By the Water’s Edge: A Chronicle of Two Creeks” Our January-March 2005 issue highlighted the riparian habitats of the East Bay’s Alameda Creek watershed. Recently, the Alameda Creek Alliance (ACA) received $1 million from the National Fish and Wildlife … Read more

Casino Proposal at Arrowhead Marsh

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The 1,220-acre Martin Luther King Jr. Regional Shoreline Park, near the Oakland Airport, includes 72 acres of restored wetlands and the distinctively shaped Arrowhead Marsh, which reaches out into the waters of San Leandro Bay. These wetlands, in the midst … Read more

Letter from the Publisher

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Parking the car in front of my house a few weeks ago, I noticed movement across the street. It was a deer—a mature doe, I believe—walking up the sidewalk in the early evening twilight. Aware of my presence, but not … Read more

Book Review: The Trees of San Francisco

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The Trees of San Francisco, by Mike Sullivan, Pomegranate Communications, 2004, 160 pages, $19.95 (www.pomegranate.com). This is not a book about the native trees of San Francisco. In fact, there are very few trees native to San Francisco, which was … Read more

Starry, Starry Night

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We humans have evolved to be outside in the daylight. But there are delights awaiting those who venture forth at night. Revel in the cosmic mysteries of the star-filled sky, and open your senses to the shadowy world of nature’s night shift.