In the San Francisco Bay Area, slices of nature pop up in the most unexpected places, a testament to the region's wealth in biodiversity and the resilience of its natural systems. Bringing nature to urban areas is not just about ensuring the survival of species, but enhancing people's quality of life through a fulfillment of our innate need to be with nature.

bobcats on a fence

Country Cat, City Cat

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A Marin County-based conservation photographer spends many hours looking at wildlife, and bobcats—both in the wild and around the neighborhood—are her favorite subject.

Urban Rat Watcher’s Guide

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Rats don’t have the best reputation, but you’ve gotta respect these adaptable survivors! Here’s how to identify your city’s rats.

san francisco in 1851

What a City Can Do for Nature

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In the early 1990s, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service reviewed the status of a rare coastal sand dune plant called the San Francisco lessingia, which grows only in San Francisco and San Mateo Counties. The background the service … Read more

Amani Dunham

Birding Through 2020

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Fall migration is underway in the Bay Area. Meanwhile birding in general is having a moment amid the pandemic, social change, and political tension.

Lord of the Flies

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Bored at home? Learn how to train common flies to ride on your finger like miniature falcons.

Can Parks Help Cities Fight Crime?

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This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article. The relationship between parks and crime remains the subject of debate. Some scholars say parks and other urban green spaces prevent violence. When vacant … Read more