Wildlife: Invertebrates, Reptiles, Amphibians

To some, species such as nudibranchs, sweat bees, tarantulas, and red-legged frogs are lumped into the great wide world of creepy-crawlies. But these underfoot and underwater animals can be surprisingly interesting, albeit sometimes obscure. The sense of wonder and curiosity that these species spark is a reminder of wildlife’s inherent value, no matter the size or number of legs.

Spreading the Buzz About Native Bees

June 19, 2014 by Beth Slatkin

Native bee expert Gordon Frankie has been acquainting farmers with California's own pollinators.

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Santa Clara Water District Cuts Reservoir Releases to Local Creeks and Ponds

June 02, 2014 by Sabine Bergmann

Santa Clara Valley Water District officials say they are facing an “unprecedented shortage” of water this year, and as the ...

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The Last Oyster

May 20, 2014 by Sean Greene

The West Coast’s native Olympia oyster serves an important role as an ecosystem builder with its ability to filter the water. But owing to reasons that are still somewhat unclear, over the last few millennia native oysters have largely disappeared from the San Francisco Bay.

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“Bay Nature on the Air” Nominated for Northern California Emmy Award

May 14, 2014 by Beth Slatkin

Bay Nature on the Air -- nature shorts based on features from Bay Nature magazine -- has been nominated for a regional Emmy Award.

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Nudibranchs, Kings of the Tidepool, Command An Audience

April 14, 2014 by Alessandra Bergamin

There are lots of pretty pictures of the 3,000 nudibranchs species already discovered, but few specifics. Key elements of their fundamental biology are still poorly understood, or not understood at all. Or not even examined.

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Rains Lure California Newts Home to Mate (Video)

March 05, 2014 by Alison Hawkes

The rains have sent a strong signal to California newts — time to mate. A graceful, underwater mating dance is the prelude to this season's replenishment of the species. (VIDEO)

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The Beauty and the Cheeseweed, a San Francisco Butterfly Love Story

February 28, 2014 by Eric Simons

Of the 35 breeding butterfly species in San Francisco, 25 have now found a non-native host plant they can work with. In an area this urban, undesirable weeds growing in sidewalk cracks have become vital to the life of butterflies.

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What’s Small, Ladybug-Like, and Golden All Over?

February 27, 2014 by Rachel Diaz-Bastin

A few years ago a Bay Nature reader spotted something golden and shiny on her carpet. Suspecting it was a piece of jewelry she picked it up, only to find it was alive! What kind of beetle is golden, metallic and looks like a ladybug?

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Western Monarch Population Hanging On

February 18, 2014 by Alessandra Bergamin

Monarch butterfly populations in California’s coastal overwintering sites showed a slight -- and surprising -- rebound in 2013 after more than a decade of dwindling numbers.

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Battle of the Ants at Jasper Ridge

January 13, 2014 by Brendan Buhler

One of the keys to their success is that Argentine ants are much less aggressive toward other Argentine ants than they are toward other species. They share information, resources, and trails; they are so cooperative with each other they appear to function as a single colony, with many queens and many nests.

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