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Bay Nature magazineOct-Dec 2011

Latest from San Francisco Bay

Book Review: Natural History of San Francisco Bay

October 01, 2011 by Dan Rademacher

By Ariel Rubissow Okamoto and Kathleen M. Wong, 2011, UC Press, 352 pages, $24.95 paperback, $65 hardcover. The latest installment ...

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New Photo Exhibit Reveals Diversity in a Cubic Foot of SF Bay

September 14, 2011 by Elizabeth Proctor

The Golden Gate Bridge, approaching its 75th anniversary, is the most photographed bridge in the world -- but what about what lies underneath it? Photographer David Liittschwager decided to address just that and discovered that the number of living things that pass through a cubic foot of water here in an hour is greater than the number of cars that have ever driven over it.

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Top Shark: This One Goes to Seven!

July 01, 2011 by Michael Ellis

The biggest shark in the Bay is the seven-gill--with two more gill slits than the average shark. Why the extras? Well, turns out they’re probably an evolutionary accident, but these are still fascinating animals--up to 10 feet long, and swimming right out there in the Bay!

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A Good Season for Bay Herring

March 01, 2011 by Juliet Grable

Each winter, a strange spectacle takes over San Francisco Bay. You'll see evidence of it: moving rafts of agitated birds; strings of cormorants; pods of sea lions; plunge-diving pelicans. And fishing boats out on the Bay. But you won't see the cause for this excitement: thousands of herring en route to their spawning grounds. This year's season has been pretty good, but some folks think we should still go lightly on the lowly herring.

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Story Update: Subtleties of the Subtidal

February 15, 2011 by R. Adam Chasey

This past October, we reported on a landmark plan to preserve and restore the subtidal habitats of the San Francisco Bay – thousands of acres that sit mostly out of sight and out of mind below the surface of the Bay. In late January, the Final San Francisco Bay Subtidal Habitat Goals Report addressing this plan was released.

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Subtleties of the Subtidal

October 01, 2010 by Ariel Rubissow Okamoto

San Francisco Bay is both familiar and mysterious. Millions see it every day, yet we almost never glimpse beneath the steely surface. From eelgrass and oyster beds to mudflats and sand waves, there’s a lot to learn about. An innovative coalition is working to set an agenda for 50 years of research and restoration that will illuminate and resuscitate the vast wilderness below the lowest tides.

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Was there ever a waterfall at the Golden Gate?

July 01, 2010 by Michael Ellis

Q: Rumor has it there might have been a waterfall at the Golden Gate during the last ice age, when ...

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New Plan for the “Hidden Bay”

June 18, 2010 by Dan Rademacher

Every day, millions of people drive over it on a half dozen bridges. Ferries and freighters cross it. Windsurfers and kayakers and boaters ply its waters. It's the picture-postcard backdrop for thousands of tourists along the San Francisco waterfront. And yet much of the real action in San Francisco Bay is hidden from us beneath murky waters. A new plan aims to change that...

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Have Your Say in 50 Years of Restoration

February 26, 2010 by Aaron Freifeld

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will be hosting two public workshops in March to explain and hear comments on a 50-year plan for restoring the San Francisco and Suisun Bays, which have lost 90 percent of their wetlands. Find out how you can take part in the restoration...

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All in a Roe

January 01, 2009 by Glen Martin

This winter, as they have for decades, fishermen in the Bay’s last commercial fishery will launch their boats in search of spawning herring. These small fish come into the Bay from the ocean to lay their eggs. People aren’t the only ones on the hunt for herring; seals and seabirds depend on this bounty as well. But changing consumer tastes, rising costs, and unstable marine conditions have put the squeeze on the both the hunter and the hunted, and now the survival of this historic fishery is very much in question.

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