Latest Articles

Tule Elk Relocated As Numbers Rebound

May 07, 2014 by Elizabeth Devitt

How do you relocate a 1,000-pound bull? Wildlife officials truck California's "homegrown elk" to new sanctuaries.

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New Genetics Research May Shed Light on the Secretive Salt Marsh Harvest Mouse

May 06, 2014 by Rachel Diaz-Bastin

Although many people are studying salt marsh harvest mice, or "salties," as they are affectionately known, San Francisco State graduate student Anastasia Ennis is one of a few people studying harvest mouse population genetics.

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A Long Time Coming, but the Bay’s Back at Former Hamilton Airfield

April 30, 2014 by Ariel Rubissow Okamoto

Last week a backhoe knocked a hole in the outer levee at the former Hamilton Army Airfield, letting the Bay seep back onto a landscape that had undergone 18 years of preparation for this moment.

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Tree Camping: A Bed of Boughs in a City of Lights

April 29, 2014 by Leath Tonino

My plan was really more of a prompt, a nudge from me to myself in the direction of urban-arboreal adventure. I’d wander San Francisco, neighborhood to neighborhood, park to park, paying attention to trees.

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The Drought Could Harm Research At Farallon Islands

April 24, 2014 by Alison Hawkes

Without rainwater, Farallon Islands research station is unable to function.

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Nature Below Dolores Park, One Way or Another

April 22, 2014 by Eric Simons

A Dolores Park construction hole filled with water. Was this the clue to an unresolved mystery, and a window into a piece of San Francisco history?

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French Broom and An Earth Day Message of Resilience

April 22, 2014 by Autumn Sartain

Removing French broom might as well be a message for Earth Day 2014 — pull the weeds is your backyard, however intractable they might be.

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First Person: Youth Engagement Award Winner Cheyanna Washburn

April 21, 2014 by Jacoba Charles

We first encountered Cheyanna Washburn in her role as an intern with the California Phenology Project at the John Muir ...

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First Person: Conservation Action Award Winner Craig Anderson

April 21, 2014 by Aleta George

It's sometimes hard to tell what Craig Anderson loves more: land, people, music, outdoor adventure, or his 29-year-old Toyota pickup. That's because whatever he's doing at any particular moment, he's doing it with great passion, keen intention, and a big heart.

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First Person: Environmental Education Award Winner Liam O’Brien

April 21, 2014 by Eric Simons

The architect of urban butterfly habitat projects like Tigers on Market Street and the Green Hairstreak Corridor, and the restoration of Mission blues on Twin Peaks, Liam O’Brien is a man on a mission to prove that habitats for humans and habitats for butterflies aren’t mutually exclusive.

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A New Haven for the Leopard Shark

April 17, 2014 by Alessandra Bergamin

Leopard sharks are a shallow-water coastal species, with a range extending from southern Oregon to southern Baja California. They are the most abundant shark species in the San Francisco Bay.

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The Fish We Never Knew

April 16, 2014 by Eric Simons

The Galapagos damselfish exists only in the specimens collection at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco. Bay Nature editorial director Eric Simons considers the fish and its lessons in a changing world.

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Could this be the end of California’s drift gillnet fishing?

April 16, 2014 by Alison Hawkes

The tide may be finally turning against the use of drift gillnets off California waters. WARNING: Disturbing images.

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Nudibranchs, Kings of the Tidepool, Command An Audience

April 14, 2014 by Alessandra Bergamin

There are lots of pretty pictures of the 3,000 nudibranchs species already discovered, but few specifics. Key elements of their fundamental biology are still poorly understood, or not understood at all. Or not even examined.

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