Latest Articles

Behind the Fracking Boom: Unearthing the Secrets of the Monterey Shale

October 14, 2013 by Sarah Phelan

But the pressure to exploit these resources isn’t going away anytime soon either, nor is the debate over the wisdom of doing so. As we weigh the pros and cons, a missing piece of the conversation is the land itself: What is the Monterey Formation? What is it made of and how did it get here? And what kind of habitats, plants, and animals live atop it?

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Signs of the Season: Old Man’s Beard, Lichens that Live on Air

October 14, 2013 by Ron Sullivan

Lichens of any sort aren’t plants. Lichens are not so much a taxonomic category as a way of life; as lichenologist Trevor Goward put it, “Lichens are fungi that have discovered agriculture.”

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Ask the Naturalist: Where Are the Chorus Frog Babies?

October 10, 2013 by Michael Ellis

Q: I collect rainwater to use on my garden and I’ve found Pacific chorus frogs in the black garbage can that collects the rainwater, but I’ve never seen eggs or tadpoles in there. I wonder why not; would they be too small to see? [Marian, San Jose]

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With the Government Shut Down, What Happens to Federally Funded Research?

October 07, 2013 by Alessandra Bergamin

National parks are not only recreational hubs, but they also serve as centers for scientific research and environmental monitoring programs. Since the federal government shutdown, researchers have been unable to continue their work running the risk that months of consistent study could be lost in a few weeks.

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Letter from the Former Editor: Farewell from Dan Rademacher

October 07, 2013 by Dan Rademacher

When I walked into Bay Nature’s office in February 2004, I had never run a magazine before. I was 29

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Ocean Acid Trip: The Hidden Harm of Climate Change

October 07, 2013 by Joe Eaton

Seawater has historically been alkaline, but is increasingly becoming less so. What does this mean for the ocean ecosystem in general? And along the California coast in particular? We’re just beginning to figure that out.

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Conservation in Action: Sea Level Rise Photos Worth a Thousand Words

October 07, 2013 by Daniel McGlynn

If a picture is worth a thousand words, then imagine the power of thousands of pictures of actual rising sea levels — even if, for now, the high water only lasts for a few hours or days at a time.

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On the Trail: By Land and By Sea in the California Coastal National Monument

October 07, 2013 by Meade Fischer

The link between dry land and deep water may soon be better recognized thanks to twin efforts to link together 3,300 acres of spectacular public shoreline and to make that land part of the California Coastal National Monument, a sprawling protected area almost no one’s ever heard of.

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Research Vessel Spots Blue Whales — Now Can Their Observation Help Others?

October 04, 2013 by Sean Greene

The researchers log the sighting: three blue whales. From this distance, the world’s largest mammal looks like nothing more than a silver glint on the ocean’s surface. But the spotting is significant to the researchers, who aim to protect the animals from passing ships.

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Looking forward to the future of California’s state parks

October 03, 2013 by Alessandra Bergamin

The 2011 state budget crisis hit California’s state parks hard. Two years later, the Parks Forward Initiative has been looking to ensure the park system’s future and on Oct. 2nd, asked for public input in San Rafael.

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From Perch to Pikeminnows: The Freshwater Fish That Didn’t Get Away

September 30, 2013 by Glen Martin

Our native fish may be down, but they’re not out, they’re hanging on in ecosystems they once ruled. And biologists and environmental advocates alike are working to make things better. The fish have advocates, and the exhibit is a tool for that advocacy, a means of engaging the public at large.

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The Stewardship Connection: Interview with Sue Gardner

September 30, 2013 by Jacoba Charles

For the past 20 years, Mill Valley native Sue Gardner has run the Golden Gate National Parks Conservancy’s Park Stewardship program, connecting people to the Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA), the nation’s largest urban national park.

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Bay View: Change in Nature — and at Bay Nature

September 30, 2013 by David Loeb

It can be said that the nature of nature is change. That doesn’t mean change is necessarily good or bad. It just is. And the best advice is often to embrace the change instead of digging in your heels in a hopeless attempt to prevent it.

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California’s new fracking law divides environmentalists

September 27, 2013 by Sarah Phelan

California’s new fracking law is the first of its kind in the nation to regulate this method of tight oil extraction.

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