Latest Articles

The Man Who Sees the Trash

January 06, 2014 by Eric Simons

Richard James, who keeps the beaches of Point Reyes as litter-free as he can, has an obsessive eye for the discordant note of trash. His life as a park volunteer comes with a lesson: You learn strange things when you pick up after the world.

2 Comments

2014 Local Hero Award Winner for Youth Engagement

January 02, 2014 by Bay Nature Staff

Cheyanna Washburn, a sophomore at Diablo Valley College in botany and recreational therapy, is one of those dedicated young leaders ...

No Comments

2014 Local Hero Award Winner for Environmental Education

January 02, 2014 by Bay Nature Staff

>> Liam was recently interviewed on KQED-FM’s Forum about his life in lepidoptery (2/7/14). LISTEN A trained stage actor (who ...

No Comments

2014 Local Hero Award Winner for Conservation Action

January 02, 2014 by Bay Nature Staff

Craig Anderson is the inspirational Executive Director of LandPaths, a Santa Rosa-based nonprofit dedicated to connecting people to the natural ...

1 Comment

The Rise of Cyanobacteria at Pinto Lake

January 02, 2014 by Patricia Waldron

This past fall a cyanobacteria known as, Microcystis aeruginosa, spiked toxin levels above the state's safe recreational exposure limit at Watsonville’s Pinto Lake. Scientists and the community have begun tackling the problem and hope that conclusions drawn at Pinto Lake will help remedy cyanbacterial blooms elsewhere.

2 Comments

2013—A Bay Nature Year In Photos

December 29, 2013 by Alessandra Bergamin

For Bay Nature, 2013 brought environmental news, features and photography celebrating and capturing not only nature's beauty but its resiliency and vulnerability. Take a look at the year gone by in stunning nature photographs.

No Comments

Signs of the season: elephant seals, born to breed

December 26, 2013 by Courtney Quirin

One of the most dramatic mating rituals in the animal kingdom is right on our Bay Area doorstep. Male elephant seals at Año Nuevo State Park risk life and limb to be the guy who gets to impregnate up to 75 females.

No Comments

Before the Annual Fungus Fair, It’s All About Finding the Right Mushroom

December 23, 2013 by Emily Moskal

Served in French dishes under the alias pom pom du blanc, lion’s mane has a texture and taste resembling lobster or shrimp. Chris Schoenstein, a lifelong enthusiast and member of the Mycological Society of San Francisco, has only seen one 2 or 3 times. But that, if you’re a mushroom hunter, is the hook that keeps you coming back to an event like the Wunderlich Foray.

2 Comments

Cordell Bank and Gulf of the Farallones Looking to Expand

December 17, 2013 by Rachel Diaz-Bastin

A proposal now under NOAA consideration would more than double the size of the sanctuaries, and protect the entire Sonoma County coastline and part of the Mendocino coastline to Point Arena, as well west to the edge of the continental shelf.

2 Comments

Capturing King Tides Through Citizen Science

December 13, 2013 by Alessandra Bergamin

Since 2010 the California King Tides Initiative has been documenting king tide events through photography—presenting a very real picture of rising sea levels. This year, the project has expanded to include a citizen science program, that will help researchers ground climate models.

2 Comments

San Francisco Mulls Commercial Butterfly Release Ban

December 11, 2013 by Alessandra Bergamin

San Francisco may become the first U.S. city to ban the release of commercially raised butterflies at ceremonies such as weddings, funerals, and charity events.

2 Comments

Traditional and Modern Methods of Acorn Preparation

December 05, 2013 by Emily Moskal

Bay Area oaks are prolific, but acorn use has diminished within the last 200 years. With the help of modern kitchenware you can rediscover the art of acorn preparation and its rich history grounded in Native American traditions.

3 Comments

Restoring Antioch Dunes National Wildlife Refuge

December 02, 2013 by Alessandra Bergamin

Antioch Dunes National Wildlife Refuge has been shaped by industry and development leaving its three endemic and endangered species clinging to their habitat. But in a recent partnership between the Port of Stockton and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, dredged sand from the San Joaquin River will be offloaded at the refuge to aid with large-scale dune restoration.

2 Comments

Bay Researchers Fight Uphill Battle with Invasive Cordgrass

November 21, 2013 by Rachel Diaz-Bastin

Three years ago, managers at the Invasive Spartina Project thought they’d be almost out of a job by now. But while the ruthless and hybridizing cordgrass hasn't spread any more, it hasn't been eradicated either and this final push to eliminate it, will be the hardest.

5 Comments

 
 
 
nature_news_signup