Latest from evolution

Evolution’s Tangled Web

October 01, 2015 by Alisa Opar

Why do so many of our local spiders have traits from the earliest stages of spider development?

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Here We Go A-Spidering

September 29, 2015 by Alison Hawkes

Spiderwebs are nature's most ideal trap. And different web types represent a different evolutionary strategy of ensnaring a meal.

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Are deer twins common?

March 03, 2013 by Dan Rademacher

Are deer twins common? Turns out, yes, even though any individual twin fawn is less likely to survive than its singleton cousins. What gives, nature?


Lord of the Burrows

January 01, 2008 by Kathleen M. Wong

Ask most people to name the most important species of our grassland habitats, and they'll probably pick coyotes, golden eagles, or even rattlesnakes. But experts say that the strongest contender of all is the animal eaten by all those other ones: the lowly California ground squirrel, a true keystone of local grasslands. Belowground, the squirrels' lengthy burrows harbor insects, snakes, owls, and even frogs and salamanders that couldn't live in such a dry landscape without the squirrels' help. And above-ground, they've evolved some unusual defenses that allow them to thrive, even as they feed so many others.

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Book Review: Neptune’s Ark: From Ichthyosaurs to Orcas

October 01, 2007 by David Carroll

Neptune’s Ark: From Ichthyosaurs to Orcas, by David Rains Wallace, UC Press, 2007, 313 pages, $27.50 The thin continental ...

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Standing the Tests of Time

January 01, 2007 by Gary Brand

Walk patiently along a few ocean beaches in the Bay Area, and you just might find objects of stunning beauty that also provide clues to a lost world, fossil sand dollars that are as much as 2 million years old. These fossils, not shells but skeletons called tests, show up only near Daly City and Point Reyes, so it's a privilege to find intact specimens that have survived the rigors of the coast for many centuries.

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