Latest from flowers

Flowers Everywhere!

May 09, 2014 by Eric Simons

In a Facebook post today, Save Mount Diablo writes that this is the best wildflower season many of them have ...

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Fire Followers Arrive, with Scientists Right Behind

May 09, 2014 by Joan Hamilton

An expert in rare plants, Heath Bartosh is especially interested in “fire followers,” plants whose seeds stay buried in the ground until heat or smoke stimulates germination. These annuals flourish for one to three years. And then they’re gone—until the next fire.

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Turning Blue: Ain’t nothing but a hound’s tongue!

March 29, 2013 by John Muir Laws

John Muir Laws turns his naturalist's eye and paintbrushes to the hound's tongue, one of our early spring bloomers.

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Conservatory of Flowers

July 20, 2012 by Bay Nature

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What’s the secret of nectar?

January 01, 2012 by Michael Ellis

Q: When I see bees and hummingbirds feasting on even tiny flowers, I wonder if each flower replenishes the nectar supply, or is it a one-time offering?

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Early Bloomers

January 01, 2011 by Sue Rosenthal

While transplanted New Englanders may complain about the Bay Area's inconspicuous seasons, true Californians prefer February flowers to snow shovels. What we lack in extremes we make up in subtle and unexpected beauty. On your winter walks, keep an eye out for the early bloomers, plants that brave winter weather for an early shot at pollination.

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Blowin’ in the Wind

April 01, 2010 by Sue Rosenthal

Next time you sneeze, think of it as an homage to pollen, the key to the reproduction of plants all over the world. Look a little closer, and this stuff turns out to be well worth a few sneezes now and then!

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Flower Power

April 01, 2008 by Sue Rosenthal

Sepal, stigma, stamen, style; pollen, pistil, petal. Say what?! Like all scientists, botanists have a specialized language for talking about the things they study, in this case, flowers. Next time you're out hiking, take a few minutes to look closely at a wildflower and you can discover these fascinating, strangely named parts for yourself.

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From an Entomologist’s Backyard

July 01, 2006 by Edward S. Ross

The sticky monkey flower, common on sunny Bay Area hillsides, hosts an array of insect visitors. Edward Ross’s intimate photos of these visits are but a small sample of the thousands he’s taken over six decades of studying insects near and far.

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