Latest from the Blog

Why Bay Nature?

April 22, 2014 by Bay Nature Staff

Publisher David Loeb had his Bay Nature epiphany while hiking in China Camp State Park. That’s when he conceived of

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First Blue Heron Cam in California Set up at Stow Lake

April 18, 2014 by Autumn Sartain

A blue heron cam will be watching the majestic birds nest on Stow Lake this year to aid in research and public education.

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How Can You Tell If a Lichen Is Dead?

April 11, 2014 by Alison Hawkes

Lichens by nature are mottled and brittle looking. So how do you know when they are dead?

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Berkeley nixes plan to exterminate ground squirrels

March 28, 2014 by Golden Gate Birder

Water officials said they were concerned that ground squirrel tunnels were sending toxins into the San Francisco Bay.

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Ask The Naturalist: How Will the Drought Impact Amphibians?

March 21, 2014 by Alison Hawkes

Question: Will newts, frogs and salamanders be out in full force in the Bay Area this spring?

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Latest Videos

Salmon Return to Spawn

November 13, 2013 by Alessandra Bergamin

The Nimbus Hatchery fish ladder opened early November, signaling the start of the salmon spawning season on the American River.

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Rarely seen blue-footed boobies arrive at Point Reyes

September 20, 2013 by Alison Hawkes

Blue-footed boobies are turning up in Point Reyes after straying far from their normal range from the Galapagos Islands to the

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Footage of Rim Fire from a boat on Tuolumne River

September 10, 2013 by Alison Hawkes

The Tuolumne River Trust released footage of the recent Rim Fire that burned through the Tuolumne River watershed. The group

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Latest Articles

Nature Below Dolores Park, One Way or Another

April 22, 2014 by Eric Simons

A Dolores Park construction hole filled with water. Was this the clue to an unresolved mystery, and a window into a piece of San Francisco history?

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French Broom and An Earth Day Message of Resilience

April 22, 2014 by Autumn Sartain

Removing French broom might as well be a message for Earth Day 2014 — pull the weeds is your backyard, however intractable they might be.

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First Person: Youth Engagement Award Winner Cheyanna Washburn

April 21, 2014 by Jacoba Charles

We first encountered Cheyanna Washburn in her role as an intern with the California Phenology Project at the John Muir

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First Person: Conservation Action Award Winner Craig Anderson

April 21, 2014 by Aleta George

It’s sometimes hard to tell what Craig Anderson loves more: land, people, music, outdoor adventure, or his 29-year-old Toyota pickup. That’s because whatever he’s doing at any particular moment, he’s doing it with great passion, keen intention, and a big heart.

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First Person: Environmental Education Award Winner Liam O’Brien

April 21, 2014 by Eric Simons

The architect of urban butterfly habitat projects like Tigers on Market Street and the Green Hairstreak Corridor, and the restoration of Mission blues on Twin Peaks, Liam O’Brien is a man on a mission to prove that habitats for humans and habitats for butterflies aren’t mutually exclusive.

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A New Haven for the Leopard Shark

April 17, 2014 by Alessandra Bergamin

Leopard sharks are a shallow-water coastal species, with a range extending from southern Oregon to southern Baja California. They are the most abundant shark species in the San Francisco Bay.

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The Fish We Never Knew

April 16, 2014 by Eric Simons

The Galapagos damselfish exists only in the specimens collection at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco. Bay Nature editorial director Eric Simons considers the fish and its lessons in a changing world.

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Could this be the end of California’s drift gillnet fishing?

April 16, 2014 by Alison Hawkes

The tide may be finally turning against the use of drift gillnets off California waters. WARNING: Disturbing images.

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Nudibranchs, Kings of the Tidepool, Command An Audience

April 14, 2014 by Alessandra Bergamin

There are lots of pretty pictures of the 3,000 nudibranchs species already discovered, but few specifics. Key elements of their fundamental biology are still poorly understood, or not understood at all. Or not even examined.

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Moments of Inception: The Founding Vision of the East Bay Regional Parks

April 10, 2014 by Kenneth Brower

In 1863, not a year after Thoreau’s death, Frederick Law Olmsted, king of American landscape architecture, looked into the hills east of San Francisco Bay and saw that they were good. He imagined a park up there.

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