Latest from the Blog

Ask The Naturalist: Why Would A Mountain Lion Attack That Child?

September 13, 2014 by Alison Hawkes

“I hear lion attacks are rare. Why would a mountain lion attack a child in the midst of a large group, as we’ve seen in the Santa Cruz Mountains last weekend?”

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American Wilderness: Back to the Future in Vallejo

September 10, 2014 by Jonah Raskin

Environmental groups gathered in downtown Vallejo over the weekend to mark the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act, to ponder the meaning of the word and to filter the concept through the lenses of California’s diverse communities.

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Ask the Naturalist: Wall-to-Wall Blue Jays?

September 05, 2014 by Ilana DeBare

A Berkeley reader asks why he’s seeing so many jays lately.

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Ask the Naturalist: Best spots to photograph Bay Area butterflies?

August 21, 2014 by Liam O'Brien

Doesn’t get much better for eye candy than a butterfly on a flower, right?

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Bear, Elk and Talking Ape in Post-Apocalypse Muir Woods: What Are the Chances?*

August 14, 2014 by Sabine Bergmann

A herd of elk and a grizzly bear make an appearance in Muir Woods in the opening scene of Dawn of the Planet of the Apes. Would such megafauna stage a comeback 10 years after humans are mostly killed off?

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Latest Videos

Redwoods with Michael Ellis

May 12, 2014 by Rick Bacigalupi

Naturalist Michael Ellis tells the fascinating story of the Bay Area’s primeval giants, Sequoia sempervirens. Produced by Rick Bacigalupi.

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Acorn Woodpeckers at Work

December 20, 2013 by Rick Bacigalupi

Environmental Volunteer Bob Dodge explains the antics of the sassy Acorn Woodpecker. Produced by Rick Bacigalupi.

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Learned Lepidopterist

December 20, 2013 by Rick Bacigalupi

San Francisco’s Liam O’Brien shares his wealth of knowledge all about Bay Area butterflies. Produced by Rick Bacigalupi.

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Latest Articles

Ocean Beach’s Sand Supply Dries Up, Leaving Plovers Squeezed

September 16, 2014 by Eric Simons

San Francisco’s Ocean Beach, already struggling with foot traffic and free-roaming domestic pets, faces a serious erosion problem.

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Bay Area Seal Researchers Travel the Pacific to Save a Species

September 10, 2014 by Ted Andersen

Marin’s Marine Mammal Center is spreading its reach across the Pacific, and this summer opened a $3.2 million seal hospital in Hawaii that is the only facility in the world dedicated to treating and protecting the Hawaiian monk seal.

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One Year After the Morgan Fire: The Recovery in Photos

September 08, 2014 by Joan Hamilton

On the one-year anniversary of what came to be called the 2013 Morgan Fire, there’s good news to report. See the recovery in this series of slideshows by Joan Hamilton.

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The Only Plant of Its Kind, Living Life in a San Mateo Agricultural Field

September 05, 2014 by Becca Andrews

In a single agricultural field on the San Mateo County coast, the entire known world population of Ornduff’s meadowfoam is thriving.

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Replanting the Bay’s Underwater Meadows

August 26, 2014 by Katie Harrington

A new effort has been launched to restore 70 acres of native eelgrass in the San Francisco Bay, paid for with Cosco Busan oil spill money.

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Gardening for Wild Bees? Now There’s an App for That

August 13, 2014 by Carmen Taylor

A new iPad app, Wild Bee Gardening, draws on the knowledge of native bee experts to bring native bee conservation and gardening into the digital realm.

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The Scientists are Amateurs, But Their Coastal Research Makes a Splash

August 07, 2014 by Sabine Bergmann

After 12 years of study, an ambitious citizen science effort has recorded population figures for 34 different types of algae and invertebrates at 70 different monitoring sites. Sixty percent of the 4,000 participants have been high schoolers. Their work, scientists say, is a legitimate contribution to marine science.

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TBC3: Wrestling Climate Change to the Ground

August 04, 2014 by Mary Ellen Hannibal

It’s not “news” to Bay Nature readers that climate change is in the process of giving a serious thwack to living systems. But what’s less well understood is how plants and animals and the habitats they inhabit are moving—and being altered—in response to changing temperature and precipitation patterns.

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Bay Area Wild: Reflections on 50 Years of Wilderness Protection

August 04, 2014 by John Hart

In a world thoroughly worked over by humankind, wilderness is our term for those places that seem the least altered, the least managed. It identifies the rawer end of a spectrum, with downtown San Francisco on one end and, say, the Wrangell Mountains on the other. But the word is elastic.

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On Mount Diablo, Springtime in the Summer Heat

July 30, 2014 by Joan Hamilton

The temperature rises to well over 90 degrees on Mount Diablo these days—hot enough to bake many small plants. But the little green shrubs have just begun to stage their comeback. It’s springtime in the chaparral.

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