Accessible Outdoors

Losing your eyesight or the use of your legs doesn’t mean you lose your desire, or ability, to explore the natural world. Until recently, opportunities for people with disabilities to do so were few and far between. Fortunately, local activists have been knocking down these barriers, creating more opportunities for access, such as kayaking on the Bay, hiking in the hills, and cycling along the shore.

 

Issue Content

Bay Area Resources for Accessible Outdoors

October 01, 2006 by Jessica Taekman

Universal access to nature and recreational activities is a work in progress, and opportunities, though currently somewhat limited, are expanding.

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Birding Blind

October 01, 2006 by Aerial Gilbert

When I was growing up in Tiburon, my grandparents lived only a couple miles away and were a big part

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Got Wheels?

October 01, 2006 by Ann Sieck

Purisima Creek Preserve
The shaded understory at uncrowded Purisima Creek Redwoods Preserve on the Peninsula is a delicious place to

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Low Vision, High Adventure

October 01, 2006 by Chiori Santiago

As a sighted person, I take in most of my information about the world through my eyes. So I’m wondering

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On a Roll

October 01, 2006 by Ann Sieck

I was a backpacker from early childhood, and by my 20s thought myself a rugged adventurer, self-sufficient and in close

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Opening the Door to Nature for People with Disabilities

October 01, 2006 by Bonnie Lewkowicz

Losing your eyesight or the use of your legs doesn’t mean you lose your desire, or ability, to explore the natural world. Until recently, opportunities for people with disabilities to do so were few and far between. Fortunately, local activists have been knocking down these barriers, creating more opportunities for access, such as kayaking on the Bay, hiking in the hills, and cycling along the shore.

No Comments