Latest from youth

URBAN RELEAF

July 20, 2012 by Bay Nature

URBAN RELEAF is an urban forestry/environmental non-profit 501(c)3 organization committed to the revitalization of our communities through tree planting, garden projects and environmental education. To this end, Urban Releaf seeks to empower our residents, including children and youth, to beautify their neighborhoods. We concentrate on working with At Risk Youth organizations to promote and sustain community beautification projects, and expose youth to various fields of arboriculture, biology, and advanced plant sciences.

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Big City Mountaineers

July 20, 2012 by Bay Nature

Big City Mountaineers provides backpacking experiences for urban teens with the mentorship of adult volunteers who want to make a difference in their lives.

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Acterra

July 20, 2012 by Bay Nature

Acterra brings people together to create local solutions that enhance the natural environment through programs focusing on home greenhouse gas emissions reduction; large-scale volunteer education and habitat restoration projects, including a program especially for youth and a native plant nursery; environmental leadership training; and dissemination of information through workshops, an environmental information resource center, and a calendar of local environmental news and events.

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Crissy Field Youth Program Wins National Award

August 12, 2011 by Eric Galan

As the Crissy Field Center celebrates its 10th anniversary, the center continues to bridge the gap between urban youth and environmental education. In July 2011, the center’s Inspiring Young Emerging Leaders (I-YEL) program won the “Take Pride in America” national award given by the Department of Interior for outstanding youth program. Jie Chen, a former student intern and current manager of the I-YEL program described the award as “amazing to see and be a part of.”

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Mole Crab Decline

July 01, 2008 by Aleta George

On sandy beaches from Alaska to Baja, you’ve likely seen plovers, sanderlings, willets, and other shorebirds foraging for food in

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