Geology

The San Francisco Bay Area’s crazy quilt-pattern of rock formations — shaped by earthquakes — are the key to understanding the region’s landscapes. From ice-age dune sand in San Francisco to recently subsided land in the Santa Clara Valley or the veritable maze of earthquake faults in the East Bay, the geology is a fascinating blueprint of the region’s natural history.

Latest from Geology

Not Doomed (Yet): A Q&A With Extinction Experts Anthony Barnosky and Elizabeth Hadly

November 24, 2014 by Eric Simons

Two biologists discuss Earth's alarming extinction rate.

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Groundwater Depletion Could Lead to Earthquakes

May 15, 2014 by Katherine Bourzac

In a newly published paper, scientists link groundwater depletion in the Central Valley to geologic uplift and maybe even earthquakes.

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“Bay Nature on the Air” Nominated for Northern California Emmy Award

May 14, 2014 by Beth Slatkin

Bay Nature on the Air -- nature shorts based on features from Bay Nature magazine -- has been nominated for a regional Emmy Award.

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Why Bay Nature?

April 22, 2014 by Bay Nature Staff

Publisher David Loeb had his Bay Nature epiphany while hiking in China Camp State Park. That’s when he conceived of ...

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Is There Earthquake Weather? And Was That It?

October 16, 2013 by Sean Greene

Some people swear there's earthquake weather. Some people swear there's not. So what happens when an earthquake strikes California during earthquake weather? We called the Berkeley Seismology Lab to get an expert opinion.

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Behind the Fracking Boom: Unearthing the Secrets of the Monterey Shale

October 14, 2013 by Sarah Phelan

But the pressure to exploit these resources isn’t going away anytime soon either, nor is the debate over the wisdom of doing so. As we weigh the pros and cons, a missing piece of the conversation is the land itself: What is the Monterey Formation? What is it made of and how did it get here? And what kind of habitats, plants, and animals live atop it?

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On the Trail: By Land and By Sea in the California Coastal National Monument

October 07, 2013 by Meade Fischer

The link between dry land and deep water may soon be better recognized thanks to twin efforts to link together 3,300 acres of spectacular public shoreline and to make that land part of the California Coastal National Monument, a sprawling protected area almost no one’s ever heard of.

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Could fracking the Monterey Shale lead to the next Big One?

September 17, 2013 by Sarah Phelan

The Monterey Shale runs through some of California's major fault lines. Could pounding the earth trigger the next Big One?

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How the Monterey Shale came to be

September 02, 2013 by Sarah Phelan

There has been so much talk of a potential fracking boom in California. But how, exactly, did the Monterey shale formation become so valuable?

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Fracking the land of the kit fox, and its fellow desert natives

August 21, 2013 by Sarah Phelan

What's in store for the desert species who've come to rely on an undeveloped landscape now threatened by a California oil boom?

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