About

Ariel Rubissow Okamoto is coauthor of Natural History of San Francisco Bay (UC Press 2011) and editor of Estuary. Learn more at bayariel.com.

Contributions

Marsh Once More: The Bay Trail Takes Off at Hamilton Airfield

July 10, 2014 by Ariel Rubissow Okamoto

Looking out across the 650-acre project toward the distant Godzilla arm of the backhoe against the blue sky, I finally see on the ground what the planners and engineers have been describing to me ever since I first began writing stories about Hamilton ten years ago: a tapestry of habitats.

1 Comment

A Long Time Coming, but the Bay’s Back at Former Hamilton Airfield

April 30, 2014 by Ariel Rubissow Okamoto

Last week a backhoe knocked a hole in the outer levee at the former Hamilton Army Airfield, letting the Bay seep back onto a landscape that had undergone 18 years of preparation for this moment.

2 Comments

Bay Restoration: Lines in the Mud

June 30, 2013 by Ariel Rubissow Okamoto

Over decades of struggle, San Francisco Bay restoration has become the expectation, a difficult challenge still, but one everyone's agreed to fight for.

No Comments

Baylands Reborn: Introduction

June 29, 2013 by Ariel Rubissow Okamoto

Mrs. Semino once had to put on a pair of rubber boots to cook her Thanksgiving turkey. It was a ...

No Comments

Making the Most of Mud

February 01, 2013 by Ariel Rubissow Okamoto

San Francisco Bay has been clearing up, but that's not necessarily a good thing for marshes in an age of sea level rise. Those marshes need mud so they can keep up with rising tides.

No Comments

Taking the Measure of Climate Change At Corte Madera Marsh

January 12, 2012 by Ariel Rubissow Okamoto

To launch our new series on climate change in the Bay Area, we follow a group of researchers as they scan the bottom, poke the mud, and gauge the tides at Marin's Corte Madera Marsh, in the first comprehensive, interdisciplinary effort to understand how the Bay Area's tidal wetlands will respond to rising sea levels.

No Comments

Subtleties of the Subtidal

October 01, 2010 by Ariel Rubissow Okamoto

San Francisco Bay is both familiar and mysterious. Millions see it every day, yet we almost never glimpse beneath the steely surface. From eelgrass and oyster beds to mudflats and sand waves, there’s a lot to learn about. An innovative coalition is working to set an agenda for 50 years of research and restoration that will illuminate and resuscitate the vast wilderness below the lowest tides.

No Comments

My Hill

January 01, 2008 by Ariel Rubissow Okamoto

Everyone has a hill. A line of land up and down that makes your heart leap. A small fold in ...

No Comments

 
 
1
 
 
Get 20% off a 1, 2, or 3-year subscription to Bay Nature magazine!