Sue Rosenthal

Sue Rosenthal is Bay Nature's contributing editor.

Native Plant Sales

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April and May are great months for getting to know native plants through native plant sales and garden tours held around the Bay Area. And not only gardeners benefit: The proceeds from these sales fund valuable conservation work all over the region.

Waterfalls!

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One of the special rewards of a rainy season hike is the sight and sound of a trailside waterfall.

Altamont Power Struggle

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Cost-effective and quick to install, wind turbines seem to be a leader in the race to develop clean, renewable energy sources. But at the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area east of Livermore, the country’s largest and oldest wind farm site … Read more

Climate Change Resources

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With increasing awareness and concern about climate change, the number of organizations and resources addressing this issue has increased dramatically over the past few years. The following resource list, then, is just the tip of the (melting) iceberg.

Solar RichmondBUILD

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What do you get when you combine entrepreneurial spirit, construction and engineering expertise, and a commitment to the community and the planet? One answer is Solar RichmondBUILD, a job training, energy conservation, and community development program in Richmond that installs … Read more

The Bright Side of Fire

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Hot days and a dry year mean major fire danger in the Bay Area. But many plants are adapted to fire, and some even need it to reproduce. Even so, there’s a lot we don’t know about the natural rhythms of fire.

Berries of the Forest

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The classic image of a redwood forest is one of stately tall trees, dense shade, and lots of green. The columnar trunks of the giant trees draw our gaze up to the high canopy, but if we follow them down to the forest floor instead, in summer months we may find unexpected points of brilliant color. These are the colorful fruits (mostly berries) of the smaller plants that live in the shelter of the big trees.

Late Bloomers

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As many a plain Jane turned prom queen will attest, blooming late can have its rewards. But it’s also a challenge for local wildflowers.

Flower Power

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Sepal, stigma, stamen, style; pollen, pistil, petal. Say what?! Like all scientists, botanists have a specialized language for talking about the things they study, in this case, flowers. Next time you’re out hiking, take a few minutes to look closely at a wildflower and you can discover these fascinating, strangely named parts for yourself.