The San Francisco Bay Area's crazy quilt-pattern of rock formations -- shaped by earthquakes -- are the key to understanding the region's landscapes. From ice-age dune sand in San Francisco to recently subsided land in the Santa Clara Valley or the veritable maze of earthquake faults in the East Bay, the geology is a fascinating blueprint of the region's natural history.

Sunset Beach, creative commons photo by Caryn Becker

Dinosaur eggs on Point Reyes Estero Trail?

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Tim Hastings wrote to us wondering about “many large round, almost ‘dinosaur-egg’ like rocks dotting the muddy sands” when he was hiking the Estero Trail. Tim’s guess is that the soft rock is susceptible to erosive shaping during the rise and … Read more

Celebrate the New Year with Canopus

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Put yourself in just the right spot at midnight on New Year’s Eve and you may be able to see the second brightest star in the sky that’s normally invisible in much of the Bay Area — Canopus.

Walking the Rift Zone at Point Reyes

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Take a four-mile stroll with Jules Evens through a landscaped shaped by enormous geological forces — and full of wildlife, native plants, and a more than a few puzzles.

From the Inside Out

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Workers digging the new fourth bore of the Caldecott Tunnel are getting a once-in-a-lifetime view of one of the defining features of the East Bay: the range of hills that runs from San Pablo Bay south to Fremont. By visiting just a few accessible sites aboveground, you can find clues that tell the story of how these hills rose from their humble origins as deep ocean sediments and volcanic flows to the iconic fault-riddled hillsides of today.