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Bay Nature magazineApril-June 2018

Stewardship

The San Francisco Bay Area is bejeweled with hundreds of parks and open space preserves as well as a rich set of laws and policies meant to ensure the survival of vulnerable species and ecosystems. Real people made this happen through a dedicated call to stewardship. The organizations they’ve founded and developed have created a lasting framework for conservation to remain a public value.

Watching Wildlife Move Through Sonoma Valley

March 30, 2018 by Sabine Bergmann

Science has led us to an increasing understanding of the importance of wildlife corridors. Sonoma pioneers the monitoring of a series of corridors.

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Bay Area Climate Adaptation Collaborative Shutters

March 30, 2018 by David Loeb

An organization dedicated to responding to climate change in a nature-friendly way loses funding.

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After a Fire, Fast-Growing Flowers Lock in a Long-Term Recovery

February 14, 2018 by Hannah Johansson

We're used to thinking about how wildfires change the soil for plants. But a UC Berkeley researcher wants to turn the relationship around and ask how the plants that spring up after a fire could lock-in long-term soil recovery.

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An Early Look at How the North Bay Fires Have Impacted Undeveloped Land in the Region

October 20, 2017 by Alison Hawkes

Initially, it appears the fires played an ecological role for open spaces and undeveloped lands.

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California Scientists Release a Fly to Control a Landscape-Suffocating Invasive Ivy

September 25, 2017 by Alison Hawkes

A landscape engulfed in Cape ivy is difficult to take in. Scientists are turning to the plant's natural enemy: a small South African fly.

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Meet Mount Tamalpais

September 25, 2017 by John Hart

How people came to understand the North Bay's iconic peak.

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Find a Lot of Bugs When You Clean Your Backyard Swimming Pool? Scientists Want to See Them

August 25, 2017 by Rachel Diaz-Bastin

A new citizen science project looks closely at the insect gold mine that is backyard pools -- and already it's found potentially new species.

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The “Ivory-Billed Woodpecker of Rare Wildflowers” is Now An Unlikely Symbol of Success in an Era of Extinction

June 28, 2017 by David Rains Wallace

The Mount Diablo Buckwheat disappeared in the 1930s. It was thought to be extinct. A single population was rediscovered in 2005. And then last year botanists found a new population numbering in the millions. How has this rarest of rare plants survived?

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The Charms of Tolay Lake Regional Park

June 28, 2017 by Greg Sarris

In the Alaguali tradition, this lake in Sonoma County was a place of healing. Charmstones found in the lake bed date to more than 4,000 years old, and come from as far away as Mexico.

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Are the Bay Area’s Parks Too Crowded?

June 28, 2017 by Jeremy Miller

Are crowded parks, like traffic or sprawl, another symptom of the Bay Area's economic boom? Not necessarily.

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