Stewardship

The San Francisco Bay Area is bejeweled with hundreds of parks and open space preserves as well as a rich set of laws and policies meant to ensure the survival of vulnerable species and ecosystems. Real people made this happen through a dedicated call to stewardship. The organizations they’ve founded and developed have created a lasting framework for conservation to remain a public value.

Latest from Stewardship

TBC3: Wrestling Climate Change to the Ground

August 04, 2014 by Mary Ellen Hannibal

It’s not “news” to Bay Nature readers that climate change is in the process of giving a serious thwack to living systems. But what’s less well understood is how plants and animals and the habitats they inhabit are moving—and being altered—in response to changing temperature and precipitation patterns.

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Bay Area Wild: Reflections on 50 Years of Wilderness Protection

August 04, 2014 by John Hart

In a world thoroughly worked over by humankind, wilderness is our term for those places that seem the least altered, the least managed. It identifies the rawer end of a spectrum, with downtown San Francisco on one end and, say, the Wrangell Mountains on the other. But the word is elastic.

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In San Francisco, A Dying Forest Waits for Action

July 23, 2014 by Becca Andrews

Mount Sutro’s once-thriving blue gum eucalyptus trees are dying. At the moment, though, there's no approved environmental impact report for maintenance, and in the absence of major work conditions are deteriorating fast.

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Making Their Mark

July 11, 2014 by Victoria Schlesinger

The ideas driving the environmental and social movements of the early 1970s gained a strong foothold in the East Bay Regional Park District, thanks in large part to a cohort of young park workers hired during that decade.

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Marsh Once More: The Bay Trail Takes Off at Hamilton Airfield

July 10, 2014 by Ariel Rubissow Okamoto

Looking out across the 650-acre project toward the distant Godzilla arm of the backhoe against the blue sky, I finally see on the ground what the planners and engineers have been describing to me ever since I first began writing stories about Hamilton ten years ago: a tapestry of habitats.

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It’s Fun! It’s Science! It’s a Bioblitz!

July 10, 2014 by Joe Eaton

On the last weekend of March, 9,000 people armed with binoculars, butterfly nets, cameras, and smartphones, spread out over an ...

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Trail Trekkers Forge a New Path in El Cerrito

July 01, 2014 by Autumn Sartain

Since 2012, the El Cerrito nonprofit ECTT has built two new trails: Motorcycle Hill Trail and another called Lower Snowdon Trail. Both of these are in the Hillside Natural Area, 85 acres of city-owned open space in El Cerrito.

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Seeing America, Again: Re-imagined Art Project Connects Artists, Parks

June 30, 2014 by Sabine Bergmann

A new campaign crowd-sources artwork from all 50 states to revive New Deal-era posters with a new collection of art celebrating America’s national parks.

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Bioblitz Turns Up Ancient Find in the Presidio

June 24, 2014 by Joe Eaton

One of the most unexpected finds of the March Golden Gate National Parks bioblitz, at El Polin Springs in the Presidio, was a freshwater sponge, one of the most ancient forms of animal life.

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Beavers Used to Be Almost Everywhere in California

June 19, 2014 by Alison Hawkes

Beavers used to live across most of California before they were trapped out of existence. But could they be a solution to drought and climate change?

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